The Multicultural Research Institute and Diversity Center Assessment

by Spencer Hamlin

 

Diversity Internship Program
University of Oregon June-September 1999

 

 

" A Research Institute on multiculturalism that has both an academic side dedicated to theoretical, statistical and applied research, and a service side where dialogues and training occur as well as training trainers and providing other support services for anyone who is interested in exploring the ideas and notions of diversity. If these two sides are under one roof they will be able to share with each other everything they have learned as well as work together to learn and conduct research in ways not possible before."

 

Table Of Contents:

1. Executive Summary

2. Main Report

3. List of Schools

4. Contact list

5. Appendix

 

Executive Summary.

 

 

Goal

To create a center/institute on campus focused on diversity issues.

The goal is to create a place where research, teaching and training occur under one roof. The need is for a place where people can go confront explore their own identity and how it fits in with the rest of the world. At the same time this place needs to have the resources to help those people and the ability to analyze and research what is happening there. The Center/Institute would help people gather information about issues that relate to ‘otherness’ in our society, and also be a resource hub for students faculty and staff. This report was done with these ideas as the cornerstones of the project

 

A resource center to provide support services and training for students faculty and staff

A research institute doing applied and theoretical research while collaborating with the support service side creating the only center of its kind.

This center needs to be a place that is integrated with every level of the university helping to reach every school and office.

 

 

 

My Mission and Methods.

 

1 Mission- To research other college campuses and take an inventory of our competitors. The goal was to come up with a report that detailed what is, and what is not out there, what works, what doesn’t and what to watch out for. My mission was also to find out about the funding of any centers or institutes that I came across.

 

2 Methods. My main vehicle for gathering information was the Internet. I did research over the net on over forty schools and then narrowed those down to about twenty-five. I made follow-up phone calls to all of the places on the shorter list in order to find out more about specific places that had one or more characteristics that could make them valuable models. My criteria for narrowing down that list and evaluating programs and centers:

 

1)Was there institutional commitment ( funding, resources, staff, and most importantly, clear and intentional links between the programs and the university administration)?

2)Web sites availability clarity. were they up to date easy to use full of information and links.?

3)Had the program achieved real results like participation funding from outside sources national recognition?

4)Was there anything that related to or mirrored our goals that the students set out at the beginning of this project?

5)Was the school one that we would look at as a peer competitor role model or otherwise related institution?

6) Had the school engaged in a groundbreaking project or done something that no-one else had?

 

7)Did the school have a number of separate units that worked independently or was there a central person or group that tied all of the related efforts together?

8) How diverse was the community that the school was located in?

9) Was there an institutional plan or blueprint?

 

All of the information I gathered has been compiled in the back of this report titled Appendix: Also in this report, A list of all schools contacted and the contact information (websites, phone-numbers and addresses). My mentors this summer have been

Missy Rock

Huy Ong

Jessica Billingslea

Jason Mak

Kathleen Workman

Nathaniel Bachelder

John Riordan

Jennifer Rosen

Jessie Wofsy

Mia Tuan

Jiannbin Lee Shiao

Ann Leavitt

Dave Hubin

Conclusions and Recommendations.

 

My Findings

There are so many colleges and universities right now that are grappling with the issues of diversity that it would take centuries to catalogue them all. I generally found, with a few exceptions, that most of the separate efforts on campuses are not coordinated and do not work together as well as they could. I found that most schools have addressed the issue in some form and most have a web page devoted to diversity. There are several really excellent programs at some schools most noteworthy are Arizona State, UC San Bernardino, University of Maryland College Park and University of Massachusetts-Lowell. I saw a variety of programs that are effective and could be easily replicated here with some effort. I have detailed a description of the schools I found noteworthy in the main section of this report.

I see that what we could do here would not be done anywhere else. A Research Institute on multiculturalism that has both an academic side dedicated to theoretical, statistical and applied research, and a service side where dialogues and training occur as well as training trainers and providing other support services for ANYONE who is interested in exploring the ideas and notions of diversity. If these two sides are under one roof they will be able to share with each other everything they have learned as well as work together to learn and conduct research in ways not possible before.

To me there are two reasons for doing this. First it would be the most efficient way to coordinate/collaborate/communicate between the different realms. Second, it would provide a space where all of the different people, projects, and programs could easily gain from what the other are doing. From My findings nothing like this exists anywhere. See Appendix for a proposal that somewhat mirrors this idea.

 

 

 

What should be in the Center? I have found a number of programs that could all be incorporated into one place. Below is a list of ideas on what could be included:

 

1) Research Units on Ethnic Studies, cross-cultural Communication and group specific research (African America Studies)

 

2) Mentorship programs for first year faculty, first year students of color, LGBT students and Greeks. Many schools have programs that range from first year faculty have a one hour a week session with a faculty member to a big brother type program where freshmen could have a junior or senior who has been trained to be a role model whenever needed for the first year in school.

 

3) Facilitated dialogues lasting from 4-10 weeks for students and faculty where people could meet with the same group and dialogue over a period of time providing an alternative to weekend -long intensive training’s or conferences.

 

4) Regular workshops and conferences for anybody- see main section of report for a detailed example.

 

5) Grant opportunities for Graduate and Undergraduate research and related projects- provide a way for students to work on issues of diversity and explore new areas.

 

6) Media Center where information gathered could be disseminated quickly and effectively while also providing a place where students could learn and improve media skills perhaps collaboration with the School of Journalism.

Also in the media center part: A first rate web page keep up to date with activities, mission statement, history, funding opportunities, goals, chat rooms and online forums, and links to other resources. The media center would be the promotional unit of the center that would work to disseminate the information gathered there as well as a vehicle to let the world know what events are happening there and around the northwest.

 

7) Community outreach- mentoring for high school and middle school students as well as involvement with local community groups. It is very important that we recognize we are part of a local community that is bigger that this campus.

 

8) Library and Video Collection dedicated to studies and resources on multiculturalism.

 

9) Advisory Council- this would be the board of directors that the director would answer to. It would be made up of Students Faculty staff and members of the local community.

 

10) Visiting Faculty Research fellowships and PHD research fellowships

11) Projects to bring together the efforts of all of the schools in Oregon

 

Where do we go from here?

The Research Institute

Specifically to this project the next step would be to research funding sources and spend time generating local and in state interest for this project. There are many institutions that I found with grants and private funding as well as school funded centers. Generally I have found that the school funded programs are under-funded. Therefore, in order to really make this center a success it would take some serious outside funding. If this project is to continue it will need someone to take ownership over it. It is clear to me the most effective next step would be for someone to research funding sources for this project.

 

 

The Summer Diversity Intern Project

 

While no-one thinks that there needs to be an identical group of intern positions here it is clear that if this entire project is to succeed it will need to be driven by students. The Students bring a dynamism to the project that only they can and they also have the flexibility to commit more time and energy than a faculty member or administrator. The students are the ones who have tied together all of the different entities on campus that are involved now and they should continue to do so. The best way that I see to continue this would be to formalize what is now the steering committee into the advisory board and ensure it has even representation. Make the summer interns the working group that carries out the Strategic Plan with the guidance of the advisory board. The other crucial point that has been used everywhere is a strategic plan, once the plan is created it can be implemented and followed through on instead of a group making recommendations which inevitably get swept under the rug. Here is my suggested outline based on my findings this summer. Two main thrusts must happen:

 

1Create A Committee to develop a Strategic plan for diversity encompassing all that has been highlighted this summer.

 

2 Create and Advisory board who will have teams or sub-committees each working on a main section of the plan.

 

The Next Step

In this report I have detailed what is out there and a variety of things that could be used or incorporated here. Now the time has come to decide what we want to have in our institute in other words the next step is to create the specific proposal of what we will create here. The proposal must address: size, funding, location, services offered, facilities, personnel, relation the rest of campus( whose control will the Center/Institute Fall under?), and resources required, This could best be done by a small group with diverse representation. I recommend one or two of each of the following, staff administration, faculty, student and community member. I feel that a group any larger that six or so would make it extremely difficult to keep things moving along at an acceptable pace and would be enough to get a diverse and knowledgeable variety of opinions. Clearly there can be no further action taken until what the Center/ Institute will consist of is decided and that decision must be made by a fair representation of this community.

 

Reflections:

This summer was challenging is many respects, frustrating and above all rewarding. I feel lucky to have worked with such a motivated and dynamic group of people. Almost everyone knew what the project was about took their part and ran with it. I feel that the results that are coming from this are truly beneficial to the campus and could only have been gained in this way. We all had similar challenges and helped each other get through them. I think it is also important to note that we were working for a much cheaper rate then faculty or Grad students would have and that makes us a bargain. The worst part of this summer is now when the Administration has made no commitment to continuing this project in any way while simultaneously detailing, in volumes, what will not happen. This stance, which is quite vague has undermined our the significance of our efforts by implying that it is not necessary to have students being the driving force behind this. Also, nothing will destroy my motivation more than being told that there is no clear certainty that their project will be continued. This has been a learning experience and it has also gained great results, I am proud of this project and hope that it will continue. While I have enjoyed working on this project, I wonder will our work be continued as it should be or swept under the rug? My biggest concern however is the success of this project and what I really want to see is a group by this fall created to hammer out a proposal for this center.

 

Main Report.

Arizona State University

This school demonstrates a strong commitment to diversity on its campus and creating a safe atmosphere. The standout here and it is a nationwide standout. The Intergroup Relations Center. I spoke with The Director Dr. Chavez for about and hour about the center. It is funded by the university with a budget of around $400,000. It has 6 staff, which are all full time and are quite busy. The center does dialogues with faculty and students that last four and six weeks and it does a variety of workshops retreats and training’s. The process started with a retreat in 1996 after which a group called Students Against Discrimination came up with a number of proposals, which were turned over to a task force. That task force created the center. The Center focuses on including all groups and types of people and is the only one to do support and help programs dealing with Greek affliction. The hardest thing Chavez said was getting rid of the public perception that the center was for minorities only. They approach diversity with a multiple social identity perspective so that people can individually identify with their specific background. They also do a story telling program where people share through the telling of stories. Chavez said the other tough challenge was dealing with separate under-represented groups that wanted to muscle them by ensuring that they had representation in the center which Chavez thinks is wrong. He wants people who can work with anybody and not people who are concerned with only one area. I think that the Center shows the right kind of commitment to all inclusiveness and a holistic approach to teach diversity and understanding. This is a perfect support center to aid a campus in embracing diversity.

 

Important Points:

All inclusiveness and independence from specific interests

Faculty and student group dialogues

Started through student activism

This Staff of 7 could easily be double with the amount of work that there is to be done

 

Brown

My search of Brown revealed an example of something that many of the students at the U of O have been talking about for quite some time. Their Third World Center is a parallel to the MCC but it has a Professional director who is also a dean. This is a great example of a bridge between the two areas of college. The Director is there to make sure the center runs smoothly and gets all of its objectives accomplished. They put on cultural weeks several times a year do new student of color orientations and conduct a minority peer-counseling program. All in all they put on over 200 events a year. Brown also has extensive peer counseling for Women and Minorities. Both of these programs are for first year students. For research, Brown has a center for the study of race and ethnicity that appears to have a very strong outline of what its mission is. This center was started when a group of faculty went to the president and proposed the project. The Center has 4 staff.

Important points:

A high level administrator running the student cultural center

Professional staff person provides continuity for events to happen year after year.

Strong peer assistance for first year students ( Retention)

Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity started by a group of Faculty.

 

Cal State LA

Cal State La has demonstrated a serious commitment to diversity and has a wide array of programs that are all useful and beneficial. There seems to be a piecemeal approach here where there are many programs but they are spread out and not all under any one person’s supervision. The people I talked to knew about their own programs but not necessarily about everything else that was going on. The certificate program though unsuccessful was a good idea and may be improved on, it definitely has potential and funding sources for it are available. The problems that arose from the departments fighting each other are important to recognize and we must find a way to keep that from happening here. Also of note at Cal-State is a CD-ROM that is being developed that would ask a series of tough questions and have different answers an interactive diversity awareness teaching tool. The school is an extremely diverse school and it also differs from the U of O in that it is largely a commuter school and most students there work and cannot take full course loads so graduating takes longer. The Center for Effective teaching and Learning helps faculty to become better teachers.

 

Important points:

get all of the Departments involved on board before acting or some may feel that their toes are stepped on dooming the project to failure

CD-ROM is a good way to reach people maybe the next step after a video.

A certificate program with funding available does exist though not perfect may be a good start

Mentoring program for 1st year faculty

 

Indiana State University

This school was impressive in its commitment and originality. The idea of having a Special assistant to the president with enough power to make the collaborations happen is one I have not found elsewhere. The centralized approach seems to work in that this person is able to reach and connect many different groups. This seems quite efficient as it only requires the Assistant, the commission and the people who work in the teams. The Teams are a great idea because the avoid the burnout that occurs when you have a group of interested people who work on every project.

 

 Important Points:

having a high level administrator devoted to this an effective way to collaborate campus wide efforts and bring groups together

Having groups work on individual problems stops burnout and gets more done.

It can work to have someone who is accountable to both the Administration and a group of peers from the community.

This is also a good example of a place where grants are given to students, which creates opportunities that both the students and the university could benefit from.

 

 

Mississippi State University

The Holmes cultural center is another center that would help us model our own after is some ways but not in others. The Center does peer counseling sponsors and co sponsors cultural programs, puts on lectures and seminars and helps minority student organizations. Then center is relatively small with a budget of 200,000 but it has three administrative staff, seven grad students and eighteen undergraduates working there. It is housed in its own building and is run by an Assistant Vice President who answers to the Vice president. There is not yet a web site available for this center. Mississippi has no research based centers on diversity issues.

 

Important points:

Administration involvement and oversight as well as funding from the University

A large staff that employs grad and undergraduate students with a relatively small budget.

They focus specifically on minorities which seems to be against the norm

 

 

Oregon State University

This school and its commitment to diversity impressed me. Having Four Cultural centers that are somewhat linked together but all have their own space on campus seems like a good idea. The centers focus on Chicanos, African Americans, Asian Americans and Native Americans. Also at OSU is a fledgling ethnic studies program started in 1995. OSU also has a Vice President for student affairs which people have been calling for at the U of O. OSA while more rural, seems to have leaped ahead of the U of O at this point.

 

Important Points:

4 cultural centers all with their own place

VP for student affairs-effective way to advocate for students

3) Rural School

 

 

Penn State University

This school has demonstrated a tremendous commitment to diversity. It offers several interesting programs like the Women’s and Minority Engineering programs. The School also funds the multicultural resource center, which is there primarily for students. The most impressive thing here is how thorough they have been in outlining a plan and achieving it. The web sites are extremely in depth here helping to solidify their position. The depth and length of theses sites may also deter people from reading things that are so time consuming. See Appendix for details.

 

Important Points:

1) They have a Strategic Plan

2) University funded Multicultural Resource Center

3) Special programs for women and Minorities in engineering

 

 

Stanford

My findings were few and far between for this institution. Listed below are two research centers that seem to be standard research centers focused on academic goals. I did not encounter any sort of institutional support or resources except for the office of multicultural affairs, which was more or less the Stanford Affirmative action/ Equal opportunity Employment office.

 

Important points:

There are two good research centers here that would be good models

Stanford seems to be behind the U of O in what is it doing on the subject of Diversity and way being the rest of the CA. Schools that I have encountered.

 

Stanford Center for Chicano Research. This center started in 1980 promotes cross-disciplinary research on Mexican American and other Latino Communities in the US. See Stanford Appendix

 

Institute For Research on Women and Gender this center is a research center that was established in 1974 it has books and tapes available and does lectures and work with affiliated scholars.

 

 

Tulane University

This school has a very good system in place to help with its 25-plus student minority organizations. It has both research and applied learning but all fall under one umbrella the Coalition for Cultural enhancement. The coalition covers all of the campus resources on diversity. Those include:

 

Amistad Research Center which houses one of the largest African American repositories

 

The Southern Institute/Diversity Training and Leadership Institute. This center does quite a few things that we would want to do at the U of O. It is run by an advisory board and offers many services from web resources to research opportunities leadership training and more. It is funded by outside money and even has a web link for donations.

These centers have some things that would be great to incorporate although the web page for the Southern Institute is a little confusing. The idea of having a coalition on campus that overarches all of the organization is one step away from having them al housed together in one site.

 

Important Points:

An umbrella that pulls together all of the groups working on diversity issues

Funds coming from private sources

 

 

University of Arizona

The U of A has a group called the Diversity Action Council (DAC) which was formed around 1990. It is amazing in how thoroughly it has addressed the questions and problems highlighted in 1988 by the Arizona University System. See Appendix-University of Arizona for reams of information on the DAC. Most of its activities are based out of the Diversity Resource Center, which does everything except theoretical research. This is also like Maryland a top model for diversity at a university. What makes this one different is that it is part of a statewide plan for all of the schools.

 

Important points.

Institutional funding for the DAC and DRC.

An outlined and detailed plan that has been followed through on

This project has found legitimacy thorough the extensive web documentation available for others to see and learn from

 

 

UC Berkeley

Considering the Location and Reputation of this school I was not impressed. I Found Filipino Alumni group, Peace and Conflict Studies program, Asian Studies and Resource Center, Ethnic Studies Program with a library, and the Center for Latin American Studies. The Center for Chicano Studies was the only one that grabbed my eye. It is funded by the Melon Foundation and allows funds for grad students to do research in the Caribbean and Los Angeles. There is also an LGBT minor program, which I haven’t found elsewhere. Also there similar to the U of O are the Women’s studies and Native American studies programs.

 

Important Points:

Not much being done at this point

LGBT minor/studies program

 

 

University of Colorado Boulder

Boulder is near the top of my list of schools to emulate. They have a diversity site that outlines everything that they do in relation to diversity issues and multiculturalism. The site is called a Blueprint for Action and it outlines resources available policies and opportunities as well of the history and creation of the Office of Diversity and Equity. They have, under the umbrella of Student Counseling Services, A Multicultural Center, Cultural Unity Center, Disability Services, Minority Arts and Sciences Program (MASP),Success in Engineering through Excellence and Diversity (SEED), Office of Student Diversity (School of Journalism and Mass Communication),Precollegiate Development Program, Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgendered Resource Center, Student Academic Services Center, Women in Engineering Program, Women's Resource Center, as well as a variety of events reports and conferences. This school is very impressive especially when one takes into account its geographical location.

 

Important Points:

everything related to diversity is tied together through one office

There are several centers that work as support services

There is a strategic plan that has been enacted and implemented.

 

Additional Information

Welcome to the University of Colorado at Boulder's diversity and equity web site. This site is charged with three main purposes:

•to disseminate information about programs, policies, and issues related to diversity and multiculturalism; •to foster open communication by providing mail lists, calendars, and avenues for discussion about diversity and multiculturalism;

•and to build community among the diverse student, faculty, and staff of the University.

At the University of Colorado at Boulder, we aspire to be a place where the quality of education is enhanced and enriched by a diverse campus community — where all students benefit from multicultural experiences. In this place, we envision a campus that acknowledges and addresses the special needs of groups and individuals who historically have faced institutional barriers. We envision a place where the pervasive respect for diversity has created a supportive climate in which students are able to reach their academic potential and the entire campus benefits from participation in a multicultural community.

— CU-Boulder's Vision for a Diverse Campus Climate

 

"Diversity is a key to excellence in education. CU-Boulder is committed to enriching the lives of our students, faculty, and staff by providing a diverse campus where the exchange of ideas, knowledge, and perspective is an active part of learning."

 

 

UC Davis

There is a Cross Cultural Center which may or may not be in physical existence there is a webpage but it only contains the mission statement. There is a strong women’s research unit here as well a Chicano studies program and a Native American Language center. The school is relatively unimpressive in its commitment to diversity and seems mostly focused on research and more scientific pursuits. Most impressive here was the LGBT center, which did quite a bit of programming and has a very good website

 

Important points:

1) Some research here but nothing that deals directly with Underrepresented groups.’

2) A good example of and LGBT center with serious funding.

 

 

U C Irvine

This school has started a grass roots inclusive community/campus council that has taken the lead on the UCI diversity initiative. UCI is also one of the few schools I have seen that uses the term multiculturalism in discussion of actions taken and intended. While there isn’t a whole lot to find here one program was particularly impressive, the Minority Science Programs.

 

Important points:

ad hoc committee of campus and community people working towards a set initiative

efforts to increase underrepresented groups in scientific fields

 

 

UCLA

Having a diverse campus from the beginning and being in a more diverse community may be one explanation for the lack of any major resources for students staff and faculty of color. There is a strong group of research centers that support separate ethnic groups but there appears to be no ties between them. UCLA is also encountering problems because it has experienced a drop in the number of students of color that have enrolled in the recent past. There is a strong LGBT center that has a very good web page but the school does not fund it right now.

 

Important Points:

1) Strong Research units that are not tied together

 

 

 

 

UC Santa Barbara

Like several other US schools Santa Barbara is particularly strong when it comes to addressing and especially researching ethnic issues. Chicano Studies is noteworthy here as it does several things that we should be doing. It provides funding for student internships and well as funding for graduate research programs. The Center for Black studies is also extensive in its activities. It offers visiting research positions, which would also be along the lines of proposals already made here. UCSB is a model for dealing with the research side but is like many other UC schools in that it is already so diverse that there isn’t a huge push for any types of services similar to those offered by the IRC at Arizona State. This may highlight the idea that already diverse communities may not be in such dire need of addressing diversity issues, as ones that are much more monocultural, like the U of O

 

Important points.

1) Visiting research positions

2) Grad and undergraduate, funded research positions

3) no clear orchestration between separate units of research relating to diversity issues

 

 

UC San Bernardino

This school is extremely impressive. They created a diversity web site through the University Diversity Committee. The committee is made up of students faculty administrators and staff. It has sub committees, which break up and do all of the individual tasks that need to be done. The Committee provides funds up to 500$ for projects that any student or group can apply for. The committees mission statement is unique in that it is a statement about what specifically they are supported to do instead of the standard mission statement of what should be gained but not how to do it or what the responsibilities are. This committee reports directly to the president. The Web page itself is an amazing resource easy to navigate and full of useful info. It has a list of all campus resources available that are related to diversity in nay way making it easy to see what is available. Descriptions of the missions, commitment, activities and links offered included later in this report.

 

Important points:

Strong web resource backed by a stronger body responsible to the president.

2) Linkage to other campus resources (communication and collaboration)

 

 

 

UC Santa Cruz

This schools is way ahead of the U of O right now. They have research centers that deal with cultural issues. There is institutional commitment through the EEO/AA office as well as CREDE which is funded from outside sources. There is support for student’s faculty and staff as well as research work. The dialogue groups were great and the Chicano Latino Student Life Resource center does an amazing amount of projects. The African American Student Life Resource and Cultural Center is also well staffed and well organized.

 

Important points:

1) Schools is committed and effective in training and helping Staff learn about diversity issues.

2) The CREDE is a research center that does quite a lot although narrow in focus and is funded by off campus sources.

3) There is great support for students and academic opportunities both through the student life resource centers.

 

Chicano Latino Student Life Resource Center

Provides support for students research opportunities works

with the local community works as a support resource, do dialogues with grad students and faculty online research workshops, retreats mentorship for students and faculty, support groups and more.

 

Rape prevention education program.

This started in 1979 provides resources like videos and reference materials counseling and puts on workshops and self defense courses.

 

African American Student Life Resource and Cultural Center

This provides support for African American student to help them graduate and enter school as well. It helps to provide funding and services and facilities for collaborative efforts with other departments and divisions as well. They have a staff of 11.

Diversity Education Program through EEO/AA

Mission: To educate the UCSC staff about issues of diversity and to provide them with the tools to promote a more respectful and inclusive workplace projects include:

Diversity Dialogue groups- small groups that meet on a regular basis to talk listen and learn about the differences and fears that keep us apart. This builds trust and communication skills.

Brown Bag events

Education for campus units

Audio/Video Recommendations.

( This is a really though out and amazing project and would be perfect to use as a model for creating a way to have a diversity agenda for faculty and staff)

Also this office has a detailed 90 minute diversity workshop plan found later in the report.

 

CREDE: Center for Research and Education Diversity and Excellence.

This is part of the center for applied linguistics it does research of identifying and developing effective educational practices for linguistic and cultural minorities. It is funded by the National Institute on the Education of At-Risk Students

CREDE is in partnership with over 20 universities listed later in this report.

 

 

University of Maryland at College Park

Through the Office of human Relations program the University of Maryland at College Park has come up with the hub of college diversity Webster. Diversity web has statements from many major universities and serves as an indicator or whose’s who of college commitment to diversity. Also Maryland came up with a blueprint for diversity in 1991 which outlines the goals of the institution. It is extremely thorough and extensive and would be the best model of an institution's written commitment to diversity. For a school that was whites only until 1950 they have come a long way. See appendix for executive summary of the blueprint. It covers all aspects of diversity in a university setting that I have encountered.

 

Important points.

The best resource available for an outline/missions statement you could find and a great idea.

They have created a hub of diversity sites in the web that we should try to take part in any way possible. At the least there should be a University of Oregon statement on there ASAP. See Appendix-UMCP for a list of current member schools.

 

 

U Mass Boston

U Mass at Boston has a great historical statement on the web that talks about the process that the school underwent to get a diversity requirement. Re-occurring themes here are a Diversity working group, the creation of a video and the strong commitment to having a diverse faculty. They put on over 35 public forums in 1991 in order to involve as many people as possible in the changes that were going to happen there. U Mass Boston also has a research institute for Asian American studies that was created at the behest of the state.

 

Important Points:

State involvement in a research project

Good history of events that happed providing a resource for others

 

 

U Mass Lowell

This school is particularly impressive it has created the center for Diversity and pluralism, which is really a standout center. They stared in 1994 with a Diversity Council, which broke into five task forces, - Research and Assessment, Recruitment and Retention, Campus Life, Academic Climate, and Community Collaboration- This next section is an excellent description

Under direction of the Council, the Center for Diversity and Pluralism facilitates research, sponsors conferences, and conducts seminars to bring new perspectives to existing views on diversity. The Center also serves as a clearinghouse to collect and disseminate data and research literature on diversity issues in higher education and at the workplace. Each year, the Center fully or partially funds more than 20 programs through Diversity Grants, conducts a series of development seminars for faculty and staff, sponsors survey research on enrollment and retention, assists student organizations with program development and leadership

The Center provides seed grants has a video library has fellowships, collaborates with 29 institution of higher Ed in Massachusetts, has a library and puts on more that 200 initiatives a year.

Important Points:

Amazing model for a diversity center appears to be the best and having research and other resources.

 

 

University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

The UNC has quite a few research and support opportunities for students. Of note here is the Black Cultural center Established in 1988 it is currently housed in the student union building. It as ambitious plans for a 7 million-dollar 40,000 sq. ft complex with a library meeting rooms classrooms, art gallery and media center. The only place I have found with ambition to have a media center.

 

Important Points:

1) Plans for a 40,000 square foot center

Media center a good idea

 

 

 

University of Pennsylvania

University of Pennsylvania has a huge diversity plan detailed later in this report. The school is quite committed and has great resources for students, particularly the Albert M. Greenfield intercultural center:

 

" The GIC functions as a programming as well as a recreational space for a wide array of social, cultural, and educational programs reflecting the cultures and heritage of US ethnic minorities. In addition to general meeting spaces and a book and video library, the GIC also houses offices for the United Minorities Council (UMC) and its constituent groups; programs for Awareness in Cultural Education (PACE); and Alliance and Understanding"

This center is clearly a support center for students of color. I think it is a good model and provides resources, which are important it is clearly funded through an endowment, which is also encouraging. The African Studies Center is primarily concerned with interdisciplinary studies of Africa and not focused on American cultural issues. It does however have over 27 tenured faculty teaching courses within that department. Also, Research Center for the Study of Women-no web site available. Ditto for the Center for Cultural Studies. Center for the STUDY OF BLACK LITERATURE and CULTURE, FRENCH INSTITUTE FOR CULTURE AND TECHNOLOGY, and Center for URBAN ETHNOGRAPHY. There are a number of research institutes here all seem to be well established. Penn State is clearly a dedicated school with a variety of resources and models that could be valuable.

 

Important points:

This school has a center that offers great resources for students through the GIC.

The Research centers are numerous but none have good web pages or links to each other.

 

Contact List.

 

Arizona State University

Tempe, AZ 85287

President of the Institution:

Dr. Lattie F. Coor

http://www.asu.edu/

 

Contact

Barbara Mawhiney

Director, EO/AA

602-965-5057

602-9656827 (FAX)

Barbara.Mawhiney@asu.edu

 

Boise State University

 

1910 University Drive

Boise, Idaho

83725-1015

 

President of the Institution:

Charles P. Ruch

www.idbsu.edu

Contact

Betty Hecker

Affirmative Action Director

208.385.1979

208.385.3826 (FAX)

aafhecke@bsu.idbsu.edu

 

Boston College

 

President of the Institution:

Rev. William P. Leahy

www.bc.edu

Contact

Carol Hurd Green

Associate Dean

617-552-3283

617-552-2145 (FAX)

carol.green.1@bc.edu

 

Brown

 

http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Race_Ethnicity/

 

Dr. Miller's leadership.

Telephone: (401) 863-3080

Fax: (401) 863-7589

E-Mail: RACETH@brownvm.edu

 

 

From Brown University Student Handbook, 1997-1998

Brown University,

Providence,

Rhode Island 02912 USA

Phone 401-863-1000

President of the Institution:

E. Gordon Gee

www.brown.edu

 

Contact

Elizabeth Hart

Dean

401-863-1961 (FAX)

Elizabeth_Hart@brown.edu

 

 

 

Cal State LA

 

5151 State University Dr.

Los Angeles, CA 90032

President of the institution:

James Rosser

Contact

Eri F. Yasuhara

Acting Assoc.Dean, Arts & Ltrs

213-343-4004

213-343-6440(Fax)

eyasuha@calstatela.edu

 

Indiana State University

 

Academic Affairs

Parsons Hall, room 208

Terre Haute, IN 47809

 

President of the Institution:

Dr. John W. Moore

http://web.indstate.edu

 

http://web.indstate.edu/diversity

 

Contact

Dorothy Simpson-Taylor

Special Assistant to the President for Ethnic Diversity

(812) 237-3619

(812) 237-3607 (FAX)

aafdst@amber

 

Mississippi State University

 

MISSISSIPPI STATE,MS 39762-9503

President of the Institution:

Dr. DONALD W. ZACHARIAS

Contact

SAMUEL MILLER

ASSISTANT VICE-PRESIDENT STUDENT AFFAIRS

(601) 325-2033

(601) 325-4626 (FAX)

smiller@saffairs.msstate.edu

 

Oregon State University

 

Dr. Erlinda Gonzales-Berry, Department Chair

Latino/a and Chicana/o Studies

(541) 737-5708; egonzales-berry@orst.edu

 

 

Dr. Kurt Peters

Native American Studies

(541) 737-5668; kpeters@orst.edu

 

 

Dr. Patti Sakurai

Asian Pacific American Studies

(541) 737-5743

Dr. Robert Thompson

African American Studies

(541) 737-5742

OSU Ethnic Studies

230 Strand Ag

Corvallis OR 97331-2222Phone: 541-737-0709

Fax: 541-737-5660

e-mail: ethnic@orst.edu

 

 

 

Penn State

 

 

Multicultural Resource Center

Students may stop by 122 Grange Building or call (814) 865-1773 to make an appointment or speak with their counselor.

 

Stanford

 

Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305

President of the Institution:

Gerhard Casper

http://www.stanford.edu

 

http://www-portfolio.Stanford.edu:8050/documents/president/951004affaction.html

 

Contact

Geneva Lopez

Assistant Dean

650/725-2536

650/723-3235 (FAX)

geneva.lopez@forsythe.stanford.edu

 

 

 

Tulane University

 

Tulane University

2223 University Center

New Orleans, LA 70118

President of the Institution:

Dr. Eamon M. Kelly

http://www.tcs.tulane.edu

 

Contact

Carolyn Barber-Pierre

Associate Dean of Students/Director of Multicultural Affairs

504-865-5181

504-862-8795 (FAX)

pierre@mailhost.tcs.tulane.edu

 

 

University of California, Irvine

Irvine, CA

92697

President of the institution:

Laurel Wilkening

www.uci.edu

 

Contact

Cathy Kawasaki Oda

Senior Compliance Analyst

814-824-4331

714-824-4350(Fax)

kawasaki@uci.edu

 

 

 

UC Berkeley

 

President of the Institution:

Robert M. Berdahl

<Picture>

http://www.berkeley.edu

 

 

Contact

Sunny Merik

University Communications

510-643-8012

(FAX)

smm@pa.urel.berkeley.edu

 

U Mass Boston

 

 

Contact

Esther Kingston-Mann

Director, Center for Improvement of Teaching

617-287-6543

617-287-6511 (FAX)

kingstonmann@umbsky.cc.umb.edu

 

 

 

U Mass Lowell

 

One University Ave.

Lowell, MA 01854

Contact

Lan Pho

Director - Center for D & P

(987)934-4335

(978)934-3084 (FAX)

Lan_Pho@uml.edu

 

www.uml.edu/centers/Diversity/

 

 

UC Santa Cruz

 

Diversity Education Program

University of California, Santa Cruz

141B Communications Building

Santa Cruz, CA 95064

Phone: (831) 459-5087

FAX: (831)459-2670

TDD: (831) 459-5011

gwenny@cats.ucsc.edu

 

Last updated June30, 1999

http://www2.ucsc.edu/diversity/

 

UC Davis

 

 

UC Davis lgbt ctrhttp://lgbcenter.ucdavis.edu/about.htm

http://pubweb.ucdavis.edu/documents/ccc/Mission

 

 

UC Santa Barbara

 

UCSB Center for black studies

 

http://omni.orda.ucsb.edu/cbs

 

http://www.chicst.ucsb.edu/

 

CENTER FOR CHICANO STUDIES

Annual Report

1997- 1998

Denise A. Segura

Director

University of California

Santa Barbara, CA 93106-6040

(805) 893-3895

Fax: (805) 893-4446

Go to this site for ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

http://research.ucsb.edu/ccs/chart.htm

 

 

 

U.C.L.A.

 

Los Angeles, Ca. 90095-1361

President of the Institution:

Albert Carnesale

<Picture>

http://www.ucla.edu

 

http://www.ucla.edu/home/welcome/chancellor/affirmative.html

 

Contact

Raymund Paredes

Vice Chancellor-Academic Development

310 206-7411

310 206-6030 (FAX)

 

University of Arizona

 

Jennifer Aviles

CSW/DAC

University Services, 220

PO 210158

Tucson, AZ 85721-0158

 

President of the Institution:

Dr. Peter Likins

http://www.arizona.edu

 

http://w3.arizona.edu/~dac

 

Contact

Jennifer Aviles

Program Coordinator, Senior, Human Resources

520-621-8676

520-6213714 (FAX)

javiles@u.arizona.edu

 

 

 

University of Colorado Boulder

University of Colorado at Boulder

 

Office of Diversity and Equity

206 Regent Administration Center

Campus Box 18

Boulder, CO 80309-0018

Phone: 303-735-1332

FAX: 303-735-2425

http://www.colorado.edu/cu-diversity/

 

E-mail: cudiv@spot.colorado.edu

 

Personnel:

Ofelia Miramontes, Interim Associate Vice Chancellor

Sharon Vieyra, Administrative Assistant

MaryAnn Sergeant, Project Coordinator

 

 

University of Maryland College Park

 

Faculty and Staff Involvement

Office of Human Relations Programs

1130 Shriver Laboratory, East Wing

University of Maryland

College Park, MD 20742

President of the Institution:

C. D. Mote, Jr.

http://www.umd.edu

http://www.inform.umd.edu/diversity

 

Contact

Gladys Brown

Director, Office of Human Relations Programs

301-405-2838

301-314-9992 (FAX)

gb23@umail.umd.edu

 

University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

 

http://www.unc.edu/depts/bcc/

 

 

 

 

University of Pennsylvania

 

Center for CULTURAL STUDIES

Professor Gerald Prince, Co-Director

521 Williams Hall/6305

215-898-8458

Professor Joan DeJean, Co-Director

521 Williams Hall/6305

215-898-7432

University of Pennsylvania

100 College Hall

Philadelphia, PA 19104

President of the Institution:

Dr. Judith S. Rodin

<Picture>

http://dolphin.upenn.edu/~gic/

 

Contact

Valerie Hayes

Executive Director

(215) 898-6993

(FAX)

vhayes@pobox.upenn.edu

 

 

 

University of Washington

 

 

U of Washington

President of the Institution:

Dr. Richard L. McCormick

<Picture>

http://www.washington.edu

 

http://www.oma.washington.edu

 

Contact

Myron Apilado

Vice President for Minority Affairs

(206) 685-0774

(206) 543-2746 (FAX)

myron@u.washington.edu

 

 

The Northwest Center for Research on Women

Imogen Cunningham Hall

Box 351380

University of Washington

Seattle, WA 98195-1380

tel. (206) 543-9531, fax (206) 685-4490

http://depts.washington.edu/~nwcrow/

 

 

 

 

 

Other Contact Info

 

Web Pages

http://CharityChannel.com/

 

http://fdncenter.org/index.html

 

http://www.fordfound.org/

 

http://www.carnegie.org/

 

http://www.aspeninst.org/

 

http:// eworkwww.lions.psu.edu/diversity/fram/n

 

www.eworkwww.lions.psu.edu/diversity/fram

 

http://www.msu.edu/access/ideaone.html-

http://www.paulallen.com/foundations

 

http://www.inform.umd.edu/diversityweb/

 

http://depts.washington.edu/iesus/

 

http://pubweb.ucdavis.edu/documents/ccc/index.html

 

http://www.one-world.org/

 

http://www.culturalstudies.net/welcome.html

 

http://www.ucsc.edu/

 

E Mail for The Interns and U of O People

hubin@oregon.uoregon.edu

 

evolve@gladstone.uoregon.edu

 

jbilling@gladstone.uoregon.edu

 

spunser@aol.com

 

mak@gladstone.uoregon.edu

coolio@gladstone.uoregon.edu

riolaw@gladstone.uoregon.edu

mrock@gladstone.uoregon.edu

aleavitt@oregon.uoregon.edu

tfrank@oregon.uoregon.edu

aneelah@hotmail.com

kwagner@oregon.uoregon.edu

jwofsy@yahoo.com

jen118@gladstone.uoregon.edu

kworkman@gladstone.uoregon.edu

cgary@oregon.uoregon.edu

peter_larson@hotmail.com

Tuan@oregon.uoregon.edu

 

Jiannbin Lee Shiao

Assistant Professor

Department of Sociology

University of Oregon

Mail: Dept. of Sociology,

1291 University of Oregon

Eugene, OR 97403

Tel: 541-346-5366

Fax: 541-346-5026

Email: jshiao@darkwing.uoregon.edu

 

Eden Inoway-Ronnie University Of Wisconsin-Madison

(608) 265-5965

 

 

 

Appendix:

 

 

 

Arizona State University

Tempe, AZ 85287

President of the Institution:

Dr. Lattie F. Coor

http://www.asu.edu/

 

Contact

Barbara Mawhiney

Director, EO/AA

602-965-5057

602-9656827 (FAX)

Barbara.Mawhiney@asu.edu

At Arizona State University, diversity is one of the core purposes and values of the institution, in the same way that excellent teaching, leading-edge research and meaningful service to the community define the university. To that end, increasing diversity is regarded not so much the achievement of a goal as it is a fundamental value to be pursued throughout the many activities of the university. ASU's efforts are directed toward reflecting the larger community in the composition of the faculty, staff, and student body, and ASU advances the cause of diversity by offering its resources, its talents, and its commitment to the development of a continually improving society. Diversity is at the very core of this university.

Diversity efforts began in the early 1980's with institutional assessments of recruitment and retention programs and the establishment of goals to improve the representation of previously underrepresented groups. Programs such as Action Now and Our Common Commitment were multifaceted approaches focused on increasing the numbers of students, faculty, and staff representing diversity as well as creating institutional changes to support increasing diversity. A more recent campus assessment, the Self-Assessment for Quality and Diversity, led to new goals for further refinements in institutional processes and programs to assure diversity efforts continue to address needs and make the greatest environmental impact.

Of particular note are ASU's Campus Environment Teams on the Main and West campuses. These teams of faculty, staff, and students monitor the campus environments and promote diversity and free speech as compatible goals. Through grant support on the Main campus, innovative projects have developed which emphasize the theme of "Communication, Cooperation, and collaboration." The newest initiative is the development/implementation of the Intergroup Relations Center. The mission of the Intergroup Relations Center is to promote positive intergroup relations and improve the campus climate for diversity. The goals of the Center are to provide education and training, develop resources and data on diversity/intergroup relations, and enhance research and curriculum development on diversity and intergroup relations topics.

The university also provides a variety of support and development opportunities for students and employees. Leadership development programs (Student Life, Multicultural Advancement, Management Development, Faculty Development) emphasize diversity issues as do orientation programs. Employee and student organizations also add to the educational and support opportunities for diversity enhancement on campus.

 

 

Boise State University

 

1910 University Drive

Boise, Idaho

83725-1015

 

President of the Institution:

Charles P. Ruch

www.idbsu.edu

Contact

Betty Hecker

Affirmative Action Director

208.385.1979

208.385.3826 (FAX)

aafhecke@bsu.idbsu.edu

--GOALS--

Goals and philosophy are included below. The goals are as followed by objectives in three categories: academic, campus climate, and students. The objectives are interconnected and tie back to the goals.

Cultural and Ethnic Diversity

Vision Statement

Boise State University cherishes and celebrates diversity as a core value shared by faculty, staff, students, and the community. Toward this end, Boise State University seeks to educate a citizenry that can function in an ethnically and culturally diverse global society which is characterized by multiple perspectives and an increased interdependence. Therefore, Boise State University has established the following goals:

1. Increase appreciation of cultural and ethnic diversity.

2. Encourage a campus environment that is comfortable and conducive to learning and growth among diverse populations.

3. Increase recruitment and retention of ethnic minority students.

4. Attain graduation rates for ethnic minorities which meet or exceed those of the general student population.

5. Increase recruitment and retention of ethnic minority faculty and staff.

6. Establish a core requirement for cultural and ethnic diversity.

7. Encourage the integration of multicultural perspectives into and across the curriculum.

8. Encourage research, scholarship, and creative activity in the area of diversity.

 

--ACTIVITIES--

We were selected for inclusion in the conference sponsored last fall by Ford Foundation based on previous commitment and accomplishment prior to the WICHE initiative, thus we had a Foundation in place. This Foundation included a number of ethnic classes and coursework, a bilingual multicultural elementary education bachelor's degree program, and outreach to public schools. Much of this effort can be contributed to the leadership of several key faculty on the Boise State University campus. We also had a major and minor in multiethnic studies and a Native American studies minor. Our initial effort started with a small group of students and faculty in the early 1970's. We also had in place student organizations for Latino, African, and Native American students.

Much of our model was based on the success of the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) which is supported with federal funds. This program serves migrant and seasonal farm workers or their dependents. In Idaho most of the seasonal workers are Hispanic. This program had a success rate in the freshman year of approximately eighty (80) percent. The program provides students with counseling, tutoring, and other support services. The mentoring program has been an important element in our success. In addition, the University has a High School Equivalency Program - sister program to CAMP. Also outreach and support services include Talent Search, Upward Bound, and Student Support Program (TRI) for low income, first generation students and, of course, bilingual education at the graduate and undergraduate level.

Activities this year which will lead to accomplishment of our goals include the development and implementation of a Minority Access Program, change a minority recruiter position from half time to full time, increased responsibility for the minority student counselor and the development of a plan to increase the retention of minority and nontraditional college students.

The president will appoint an Ethnic Heritage Board this semester. Funds to support a coordinator of diversity planning, events, etc., have been requested.

This fall Geneva Gay spent a day with us for our faculty development activities.

In addition, the College of Education received monies from a statewide grant from the U.S. West Foundation to improve multiethnic/multicultural education at the preservice and inservice level. Boise State University used this initiative to produce two English as the Second Language courses and broadcast them statewide over the Public Broadcasting System. Through this initiative a full day of inservice was provided at a local school district in collaboration with two private, local colleges -- Northwest Nazarene College and Albertson College of Idaho.

 

--OUTCOMES--

The most important outcomes has been a significant gain in the diversity of our student body. We have the most diverse student body in Idaho, even though the percentage of minorities in the state is small.

Other significant outcomes include the bilingual multicultural teacher education program which has provided the training of bilingual teachers, A Journal in bilingual education, graduate work in bilingual and ESL education.

Other outcomes include a major in multiethnic studies and minors in multiethnic studies, Native American studies and as of this fall Mexican American studies.

We have been the best institutions for conferences, and workshops addressing cultural diversity. We have for the past four years cosponsored a fall workshop for Hispanic youth. We sponsor a summer science math camp for minority secondary and middle school students. This year, we will sponsor a conference in Mexican American Studies.

An anticipated impact will be the addition of a requirement dealing with cultural diversity added to the University undergraduate core.

Products:

* The two ESL Video Workshops

* Courses of study for: Bilingual Multicultural Elementary Teacher Education

* Multiethnic studies

* Native American studies

* Mexican American studies

In addition:

The Journal of Educational Issues of Language Minority Students

"last changed on December 28, 1998

 

 

 

Boston College

 

President of the Institution:

Rev. William P. Leahy

www.bc.edu

Contact

Carol Hurd Green

Associate Dean

617-552-3283

617-552-2145 (FAX)

carol.green.1@bc.edu

 

--GOALS--

From the beginning, the Boston College response to the invitation to participate in the Ford Foundation initiative to sustain cultural diversity and improve race relations was a cooperative effort. When the coordinators, who had worked together for many years on related issues on the Boston College campus, set out to prepare the proposal, we turned to our colleagues for ideas: more than sixty of them responded. The proposal that we submitted reflects the breadth of the response: we envisioned activity in faculty and curriculum development, in student mentoring, and in residential life and programming.

 

--ACTIVITIES--

a list of eleven separate proposals were the development of a mentoring program for AHANA ("AHANA" is a Boston College acronym for "African-American, Hispanic, Asian-American, Native American") undergraduates; the inauguration of a research project that would investigate the state of race relations on the Boston College campus; and the development of courses for a newly revised core curriculum. We planned faculty seminars and summer grants for course development, work with programs

Among for first year students and for seniors, and a research and course development sequence around the concept of alterity.

 

--OUTCOMES--

In the end, and along the way, a number of things changed: we succeeded in realizing many of our goals, but not always in the originally imagined form. The most evident success story from the Boston College Ford project is that of the mentoring program (the Benjamin E. Mays Mentoring Program), now (1995) in the third year of its full implementation. More than 150 AHANA students are currently working with faculty mentors, and over 70 faculty have enthusiastically joined the program. The mentoring program brings together Boston College's commitment to service with the furtherance of the intellectual goals of AHANA students: the program focuses not only on ensuring that students will complete their undergraduate degrees but also that they will go on to graduate and professional training. It has also created a subgroup of senior faculty who are much more aware of issues of diversity because of their participation in the program; this awareness, in turn, affects curriculum.

The other results of our efforts are less easily quantified. The campus climate research project provided useful and sometimes troubling results. The Ford Project research, and the survey instruments developed in connection with it, contributed to the awareness of the problems that existed on campus and the difficulties that might be anticipated in attempting to educate about them. It also helped stimulate efforts in the Housing Office to encourage more discussion about campus climate and supported greater visibility for PRIDE, a group of administrators and faculty who present prejudice reduction workshops across the campus. (PRIDE also received funding from the grant.).

Faculty and curriculum development engaged much of our time, effort, and funds, as the long planned-for revision of the core curriculum came into being in Fall 1993. We funded both groups of faculty and individuals who were engaged in devising new courses for the core that would consider issues of difference: our particular emphasis was on groups of faculty working together to develop or transform multiple-section core courses. Core courses currently being offered in English, History, Romance Languages, Management, and the School of Education resulted from this work. We also found a number of ways to cooperate with and to inform the University Core Development Committee (UCDC) as they worked on the imperative to consider cultural diversity issues not only in a one-course requirement but across the core. The Ford Project provided encouragement and occasions for their discussions, and sponsored meetings of faculty who planned to offer cultural diversity courses. Affiliated faculty members made presentations to the Committee and provided them with readings. While the idea of incorporating cultural diversity concerns into the core preceded the grant we believe that the presence of the Ford Project on campus and the funding it provided for the development of courses were important in maintaining the Committee's focus on the importance of the representation of cultural diversity throughout the core curriculum. Finally, in our evolving understanding of how best to carry the message of the Ford Project to the campus as a whole, we used the funds from the visiting scholars component of the grant and the matching funds provided by Boston College's Lowell Lecture Fund to cosponsor a wide array of speakers and events, originating both with students and with faculty groups. We are continuing to negotiate for the establishment of a permanent university fund to underwrite speakers who will address diversity issues and work with core faculty.

In seeking to ensure that the work of the Ford Project would go on beyond the date of the grant, the coordinators encouraged participants to seek both university support and outside funding for their projects. The Mays Mentoring Program has received both university backing and grants (originally negotiated by the Ford Project coordinators) from the Aetna Foundation. Other participants have received grants from the Hwang Foundation (for Asian-American Studies) and Philip Morris (for campus climate efforts). A USIA-funded Summer Institute in American History (1994, 1995) draws on the work of the coordinators and other faculty with the Ford grant and brought teaching about diversity to a wider, international audience.

 

 

Brown

 

http://www.brown.edu/Departments/Race_Ethnicity/

 

The Center for the Study of Race and Ethnicity in America (CSREA) was established in 1988 with the premise that is crucialto understand race as a historical and sociological reality in America and to understand the implications of race and ethnicityas historical, social, and analytical categories for mutidisciplinary studies and multiple modes of discourse. To coordinate and develop Brown's academic resources for this purpose, the Center facilitates teaching and research on African Americans,

Asian Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans. It also includes teaching, research,and conferences on biracials and multiracials. The Center emphasizes the interdisciplinary and comparative study of these groups and promotes analytical studies of race, ethnicity, gender, and class. Within Brown University, the Center works with departments and faculty who share similar goals and interests. For graduate and undergraduate students, the Center brings in invited scholars and speakers

for the annual events of ethnic student organizations and provides grants in support of their research in theareas of race and ethnicity in America or in the comparative study of American racial or ethnic groups with those in other countries. The Center sthe founding member of The Southern New England Consortiumon Race and Ethnicity (SNECORE), a group of colleges and universities in Connecticut, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts.

The Center was established through the initiative of faculty members from a number of departments who share similarinterests or have been involved in the teaching and research on the issues of race and ethnicity in AmericaWith the recommendation of the Visiting Committee on Minority Life and Education at Brown University and the approval of the Academic Council of the University the Center was created with the following charge:

 

To facilitate research on race and ethnicity as social constructions in American society,

including comparative studies of analytically similar problems in societies in other parts of the world

To coordinate and develop Brown's resources for research and teaching on racial and

ethnic minorities in America

To generate intellectual and financial resources for the Center, including support for new

faculty positions and for research and curricular development

 

To promote university-wide discussion of issues relating to race and ethnicity

 

In 1990 Rhett S. Jones was appointed Director, and Wanni W. Anderson was appointed Associate Director in 1991. In

June 1994, Dyer House, 150 Power Street, became the headquarters of the Center.

In 1995, Fayneese Miller was appointed Director and in 1996 the Ethnic Studies Department was added to the Center under

Dr. Miller's leadership.

Telephone: (401) 863-3080

Fax: (401) 863-7589

E-Mail: RACETH@brownvm.edu.

 

The Advisory Committee of the Center, composed of faculty appointed by the Dean of the Faculty in consultation with the Director serves as the Center's advisory and executive board.

Residential Counseling Programs

Kisa Takesue, Assistant Dean of Student Life x3800

 

Resident Counselors (RCs) live with first-year students providing each student with a trained peer counselor, experienced

and knowledgeable about Brown. RCs are a vital link in the network of support available to new students. Working closely

with Minority Peer Counselors, Women Peer Counselors, and Community Directors, RCs strive to create a sense of

community within the residential unit. First-year students are encouraged to seek out RCs for support and information on a

wide range of personal and academic matters.

 

Minority Peer Counselors

Karen McLaurin-Chesson, Assistant Dean of the College & Director, Third World Center x2120

The Minority Peer Counselors are a network of Asian American, African American, Latino, Native American and multiracial

undergraduates who provide academic and interpersonal counseling to first year students in residential units. MPCs provide

informaion and advice on issues of oppression - they conduct workshops and forums within units, offer student-to-student

counseling and sponsor study breaks throughout the year. MPCs are committed to the promotion of racial and cultural

pluralism at Brown. They have had a significant impact on making incoming Third World students feel comfortable at Brown.

MPCs are selected by a committee of administrators and former counselors.

 

Women Peer Counselors

 

Kristen Renn, Assistant Dean of Student Life, Program Director x3415

Women Peer Counselors (WPC) provide support to all first-year students on issues of sexuality, harassment and assault,

body image and eating concerns, gender, sexism and diversity. There is one WPC in each first-year unit, and together with

the other counselors (MPC, RC) they facilitate the establishment of a residential unit that values individual differences as well

as a sense of the broader Brown community.

Community Directors and Residential Programmers

Mary Greineder, Associate Dean of Student Life, Program Director x3800

Community Directors (CD) are graduate students who reside in undergraduate housing and have primary responsibility for

developing and maintaining a sense of community within their respective area of campus. CDs will be responsible for facility

management, crisis support and conflict resolution for students, and supervision of Resident Programmers. The CD will work

in close contact with the Associate Dean and will integrate their duties and the activities of their campus area with other staff

of the Offices of Student and Residential Life.

Residential Programmers (RP) are undergraduate students whose primary focus is to work with the residents of their

neighborhood to design and implement programs, activities and social functions to improve and stimulate the overall

community environment in the residence halls. The RP will also serve as a resource person for upper-class students in their

residence halls on issues of personal counseling, conflict resolution, and building maintenance.

 

Faculty Fellows

 

Professor Ted Morse, Head Faculty Fellow x1444

Dean Leonard Perry, Director x2580

The Faculty Fellow Program seeks to provide opportunities for resident students and members of the faculty to interact

informally. They sponsor weekly study breaks, lunches, meetings and other social, cultural and educational programs

throughout the year. Many Faculty Fellows and their families live in University housing and are readily available to student

needs and interests. Dean Perry works with Professor Morse in support of the Faculty Fellow program.

From Brown University Student Handbook, 1997-1998

Brown University,

Providence,

Rhode Island 02912 USA

Phone 401-863-1000

President of the Institution:

E. Gordon Gee

www.brown.edu

 

Contact

Elizabeth Hart

Dean

401-863-1961 (FAX)

Elizabeth_Hart@brown.edu

 

 

 

 

Cal State LA

 

5151 State University Dr.

Los Angeles, CA 90032

President of the institution:

James Rosser

Contact

Eri F. Yasuhara

Acting Assoc.Dean, Arts & Ltrs

213-343-4004

213-343-6440(Fax)

eyasuha@calstatela.edu

Diversity WORKS at Cal State L.A.!

Located five miles from the center of downtown Los Angeles, California State University Los Angeles is itself a center of diversity. The student population is one of the most diverse in the country. Nearly all students are first or second generation Americans or members of traditionally subordinated groups, many of whom have distinctive linguistic and cultural practices. In a state that originated the English-only movement a decade ago, it is perhaps ironic that three-quarters of entering Cal State L.A. freshmen indicate that English is not their first language.

The mission of CSLA has long been to serve populations which have been traditionally underserved, providing equity in access and excellence in academic programs. Soon after its founding in 1947, the campus soon gained the well-deserved reputation as the Los Angeles college providing excellent educational opportunities for students who needed to work while pursuing their degrees. An institutional operating structure--including year-round, day, evening, and weekend sessions--opened doors for older students and African American, Latina/o and Asian American students who could not attend traditional colleges that required them to leave work or abandon family obligations.

Today, approximately 44% of the 18,000 CSLA students identify themselves as Hispanic/Latino; 27% as Asian/Pacific Islander; 19% as white, non-Hispanic; 10% as African American; 1% as American Indian; and1% as other. Over 70% of the entering freshmen identify a language other than English as their first language, the average age of a CSLA student is 28, and the median family income is below $20,000 annually. An overwhelming majority are the first in their families to attend a university. Most students work full or part time and commute, while taking, on average, 70% of a fulltime course load. In short, diversity permeates every aspect of Cal State L.A. Below are some specific examples of diversity-focused or -incorporating programs, projects, and initiatives :

 

• Intercultural Proficiency Project, funded by a 3-year $580,000 grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, to prepare our students to live and work in the new multicultural environment. Interdisciplinary teams of faculty are currently engaged in curriculum development for a 26-quarter unit interdisciplinary certificate program in Intercultural Proficiency, which will be launched in January 1997.

 

• New General Education Program, scheduled to take effect Fall 1997, that incorporates diversity more substantively than the current program. Faculty are currently engaged in curriculum development.

 

• -ISM (N.) Project. Cal State L.A. was one of 12 campuses chosen to participate in this Ford Foundation sponsored project in which students were required to produce a video about negotiating diversity in their own lives.

 

• NEH Humanities Focus Grant Project "The Chinese Diaspora in Southern California: Culture, Ethnicity, Community, and Asian American Studies." Ten faculty members worked with renowned scholars during summer 1996 to study and develop curriculum for an Asian American Studies Program.

• A number of programs in science, engineering, and the health-related fields, funded by such agencies as the National Institute for Health and U.S. Public Health Service, that encourage students from underrepresented groups to pursue careers in those fields:

Minority Biomedical Research Support Program (MBRS)

• Minority Engineering Program (MEP)

• Health Careers Opportunity Program (HCOP)

• Model Hispanic Health Careers Opportunity Program (MHHCOP)

• Cultural Diversity Celebration, a weeklong series of programs in the spring that draws hundreds of people to campus to share a variety of cultural performances and discussions of issues facing the community.

 

• Center for Effective Teaching and Learning promotes strategies that specifically address the needs of a diverse learning community.

 

• Title III Gran t: Strengthening the Institution. A multi-year grant to address the advisement needs of our diverse student population in order to enhance retention.

 

• Harriet and Charles Luckman Fine Arts Complex, built to celebrate the performances and visual art of all cultures and races. Specially designed outreach and educational programs bring thousands of young people and their families, many nontraditional patrons of the fine and performing arts from the surrounding communities, to campus for arts programs.

• Asian and Asian American Institute, established to promote research, awareness, and community involvement in issues affecting Asian/Pacific Americans.

• The diversity of the faculty and administration. Over the past decade and a half, the campus has made a concerted effort to recruit and retain diverse faculty of color. The ranks of upper and mid-level administration, in particular, speak to the institution's continuing committment to diversity, as may be seen in the video "A Story Worth Wider Telling" that was prepared for the Ford Foundation's Campus Diversity Initiative in 1995.

Notes From Conversation with Jan Harris (School of Health and Human Services) 8/20/1999

Jan Inherited the Intercultural proficiency project that started with an unsolicited donation that the dean dumped in her department. The Project created curriculum for a 26 quarter-credit certificate which inspired some animosity with other departments who felt that some of the courses that were created were already being done. The main areas of study were criminal psychology, nursing, social work and child development. Other departments could also use some of their courses to substitute for the courses specifically offer by the ICP. Students did not get really into this project and it only has 8-9 in the program right now. Mrs. Harris thinks that this is because little was done to get other schools on campus involved/excited and so there was no active recruitment of students to this program. Also they have a mentoring program for all new faculty where they spend two hours a week with older mentors during the winter term of their first year.

 

 

 

Indiana State University

 

Academic Affairs

Parsons Hall, room 208

Terre Haute, IN 47809

 

President of the Institution:

Dr. John W. Moore

http://web.indstate.edu

 

http://web.indstate.edu/diversity

 

Contact

Dorothy Simpson-Taylor

Special Assistant to the President for Ethnic Diversity

(812) 237-3619

(812) 237-3607 (FAX)

aafdst@amber

 

Indiana State University has evolved into a comprehensive public service university over the past one hundred years. Located in South Central Indiana the university has changed because the environment in which it functions has changed. Although many of the students come from within a one hundred mile radius of the institution, its reputation as a first rate teaching institution where students come first, has attracted a student body from all over the nation and the world. As the world has become a more global community, Indiana State has engaged in an introspective strategic planning process. Our Strategic Plan is an institutional response to the multiple challenges and societal changes. Strategic Goals help ISU to respond to the 21st century as a progressive public university.

President John Moore brought to Indiana State University a vision of inclusivity which prepares students to live in a global society and work in a global economy. By adopting a set of core values to assure a quality learning environment, the university has embarked in transforming its undergraduate curriculum, its general education curriculum, its residential facilities and developing living communities, as well as enhancing classroom practices through transfer of technology.

Diversity as a distinctive strategy at Indiana State University is set within the context of the core values; access, service, success, innovation and excellence. Since 1994, the institution has made significant strides in faculty development, staff development, community outreach and the establishment of ongoing diversity training programs. Points of pride are the annual diversity conferences, a nationally recognized curriculum/classroom transformation intiative, a comprehensive climate study, a Student Diversity development intiative and a new Lilly Foundation funded First Year Initiative. In addition, a Campus Climate Study process has been initiated and follow-up climate and diversity training has begun to be implemented. Campus initiatives are coordinated with the President's Commission on Ethnic Diversity.

THE PRESIDENT'S COMMISSION ON ETHNIC DIVERSITY:

Commission members are representatives of the multiple constituency groups at ISU who advise and assist the President about diversity issues on and off campus. Commissioners serve on a voluntary basis for one to three years.What is the Commission's purpose?

While the commission assists Indiana State University in developing cultural awareness among its various constituencies, it advocates a positive approach to  diversity within the curriculum and research throughout the campus life. Two main goals are:To ensure that the University community gains a greater appreciation of the cultural and ethnic diversity of the United States

To contribute to an understanding of the changing relationships of the U.S. with other nations

What is the Commission's mission?

To advocate for multicultural values, interests and programs.

To advise on policy and practices in matters pertaining to ethnic diversity.

To advise and assist in the recruitment and retention of people of color.

To advise and assist in promoting campus values, norms, and conduct that foster an increased sense of community.

To advise and assist in infusing diversity in the teaching and learning process.

To advise and assist in the presentation of multicultural/international extracurricular programs and activities.

To advise and assist in promoting constructive relationships between the University and the community.

To create a more visible, coherent, ongoing initiative that includes a variety of campus diversity programs.

What is the responsibility and structure of the Commission? Responsibilities:

fact finding entity that identifies issues, discerns their relevance to diversity and determines strategic change points

conduit and clearinghouse on diversity for the ISU community

provides program direction and evaluates and assesses the impact of diversity initiatives

identifies and promotes incentives and rewards 

coordinates the strategic ethnic diversity plan

defines and structures role and organization of the commission. 

Structure:

Special Assistant to the President for Ethnic Diversity, Chairperson 

Steering Committee collects data from subcommittees and coordinates direction including assessment

Subcommittees evaluate, advise and suggest programmatic directions

Training the Trainers:  Creates forums and curriculum for diversity training

Student Relations:  Advises commission on student diversity issues

Faculty Relations:  Conduit for faculty inclusion in diversity initiatives, promotes curriculum transformation

Staff Relations:  Advises commission on staff diversity issues, coordinates training sessions for staff

International Relations & Development:  Advise and develop diversity agenda for international programming on campus and globally

Community Outreach:  Develops community/university relations programs and projects

Campus Programs/Grants and Fundraising:  Identifies grants and other fundraising projects, develop recognition agenda.     

   

Notes from phone interview with Dorthy Simpson-Taylor. 8/ 17/99

They their efforts around the four main areas that need to be addressed under diversity, Representation, Scholarship, campus climate and intercultural relations. They work on diversity initiatives among those four areas by using separate teams that are all under that supervision and coordination of the Special Assistant to the president for ethnic diversity SEPED. They set strategic goals and plans around increasing the value of their efforts and the college experience. The SEPED works directly with the commission on ethnic diversity that has representatives from all interested groups in the area. This commission is also made up of people who lead and work on the teams previously mentioned.

MRS Simpson Taylor says her job is to create and help collaborations among many groups on and off campus and to work with all of them. She is the one who orchestrates almost all of the activities that go on. Speakers, diversity training, conferences., they have a visiting minority scholar program that brings in people for one or two days and provides matching funds for departments that want to do the same. Also there are challenge grants provid3d to students when they meet certain criteria. ( I like the idea of having grant opportunities for students who can have the means to work on those projects) She is particularly concerned with helping students gain during their time at college a particular kind of competence that comes from being exposed to new and different things.

The lily foundation collaboration was to enhance 1st year experiences across the board so they tapped into that as a resource for diversity funding and also pursued statewide matching funds. This was also related to gender fair practices and then t because a part of a ford foundation initiative. They do a summer and a mid year institute for faculty and do diversity training’s " all the time" They also have the goal of building their internal capacity by training trainers

\Their approach toward faculty diversity training was to find the types of trainings and aids that help faculty become more effective and efficient and build diversity into the programs instead of having a straightforward " diversity training"

This job was created because the president who came in 1994 decided he wanted to change things and also wanted to do and did a climate study.

 

 

 

 

Mississippi State University

 

MISSISSIPPI STATE,MS 39762-9503

President of the Institution:

Dr. DONALD W. ZACHARIAS

Contact

SAMUEL MILLER

ASSISTANT VICE-PRESIDENT STUDENT AFFAIRS

(601) 325-2033

(601) 325-4626 (FAX)

smiller@saffairs.msstate.edu

Mississippi State University is a public land-grant institution located in Starkville, Mississippi. Mississippi State is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). MSU is a member of the Southeastern Athletic Conference (SEC).

The United States population is rapidly changing. Projections indicate that the American minority will be one-third of the U.S. population by the year 2000 A.D. and approximately 45% by the year 2050. At Mississippi State University, our vision includes the enhancement of our basic understanding of factors that facilitate or impede the effective participation of individuals from culturally diverse backgrounds on our campus. We believe there is a need to develop, identify and create a culturally eclectic and equitable quality educational system here. As the demographics of the workforce and the student body evolves, we believe that promoting diversuty on our campus requires cooperation among all areas of our campus constituency. Such collaborative efforts, we believe, will allow us to model, by example, as well as demonstrate our leadership in sucessfully participating in an increasingly diverse learning community.

While we recognize that we have much work ahead of us, we also believe that we are making some progressive steps and are engaged in several worthy endeavors with respect to our diversity initiatives. When reviewing the nine campus diversity priorities, as defined by AAC&U, we think our primary strengths are quite evident in the following areas:

CURRICULUM TRANSFORMATION

RECRUITMENT, RETENTION, AND AFFIRMATIVE ACTION

CAMPUS-COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS/DIVERSITY RESEARCH,EVALUATION AND IMPACT

YOU MAY VISIT OUR UNIVERSITY'S WEB SITE AT:

http://www.msstate.edu

 

 

 

 

Oregon State University

 

Oregon State University

ETHNIC STUDIES DEPARTMENT

Welcome to the OSU Ethnic Studies Department Homepage

The Ethnic Studies department was formally established in January 1995, and has completed its third academic year teaching African American Studies, Native American/Alaskan Native Studies, Asian American Studies, and Chicano-a/Latino-a Studies.

What's New:

Our first Ethnic Studies Major, Marcel Brooks received his degree in May 1999. Marcel will begin graduate studies in College Student Services Administration this fall. Congratulations Marcel!

The Sacred Landscapes Conference sponsored by the Department of Ethnic Studies and other University entities was a great success, drawing over 300 participants. Professor Kurt Peters deserves special recognition for his leadership role in this event.

Faculty:

Dr. Erlinda Gonzales-Berry, Department Chair

Latino/a and Chicana/o Studies

(541) 737-5708; egonzales-berry@orst.edu

 

 

Dr. Kurt Peters

Native American Studies

(541) 737-5668; kpeters@orst.edu

 

 

Dr. Patti Sakurai

Asian Pacific American Studies

(541) 737-5743

Dr. Robert Thompson

African American Studies

(541) 737-5742

Please take a minute to read a short biography of our faculty.

How to Find Us:

OSU Ethnic Studies

230 Strand Ag

Corvallis OR 97331-2222Phone: 541-737-0709

Fax: 541-737-5660

e-mail: ethnic@orst.edu

 

 

Hot Links:

•Information on our Faculty •Major/Minor Information •Internship Guidelines •Cross Cultural Perspectives on Agricultural Labor: Learning Through Listening

•Other sites of interest •Text of an article "The Undermining of Ethnic Studies" by Evelyn Hu-DeHart

(Center for Studies of Ethnicity and Race in America)

•OSU Indian Education Office •Oregon Indian Coalition on Post-Secondary Education homepage

(includes calendar of state-wide events)

•Contact us by e-mail: ethnic@orst.edu

•About Oregon State University (central University web site)

 

 

 

 

 

Penn State

THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY DIVERSITY STRATEGIC PLAN

The process that initiated development of this document began in 1994 when each college, administrative unit, and campus

was mandated to prepare a diversity strategic plan to promote equity for its faculty, staff, and students. This document

addresses continuing challenges that are common to many units and for which the efforts of individual units are insufficient to

resolve. The specific challenges discussed herein are:

Developing a Shared and Inclusive Understanding of Diversity

Creating a Welcoming Campus Climate

Recruiting and Retaining a Diverse Student Body

Recruiting and Retaining a Diverse Workforce

Developing a Curriculum That Supports the Goals of Our New General Education Plan

Diversifying University Leadership and Management

Coordinating Organizational Change to Support Our Diversity Goals

 

What is the Multicultural Resource Center?

The Multicultural Resource Center (MRC) provides professional counseling and educational services for African/Black

American, Latino/Hispanic American, Asian & Pacific American, and American Indian/Alaskan Native undergraduate

students. Its staff is dedicated to helping students succeed and graduate from Penn State.

What can the MRC do for a student?

The MRC assists students in meeting the challenges associated with education and attaining a degree at a major research

institution. For instance, if you have personal concerns or an issue related to the University--such as academic or financial

aid--MRC can help you. More specifically, MRC staff work with students in a variety of areas including:

University policies, procedures, and regulations;

study skills, time management, and test-taking strategies;

obtaining free tutorial assistance;

interpersonal relationships with peers and family, conflict resolution, and other personal matters;

careers, internships, graduate and professional school, education abroad, and job opportunities;

assistance with questions on financial aid, scholarships, and money management;

educational programming, including study groups and seminars.

MRC staff act as advocates for students in dealing with the complex makeup of a large university. They are eager to meet

and talk with students.

What about students who don't think they need the assistance of an MRC counselor?

MRC counselors want to meet with every student eligible for its services, regardless of a student's present circumstances.

Someday you may face a problem that's too big to handle on your own. The help of a counselor could be very important.

Why wait? Get to know your MRC counselor now, so that if you need help in the future, you'll already have someone who

knows and understands you.

How do MRC counselors differ from academic advisers?

MRC counselors work with students in many areas; however, they do not provide the primary assistance for making up

students' class schedules, as academic advisers do. Although MRC counselors can give additional insight into course

selections, their focus is in helping students develop skills and strategies that lead to success in graduation and beyond.

It is part of the overall purpose of the MRC to promote and reflect the ethnic richness and diversity of its students within the

University community and to advocate for their needs.

How can students meet their MRC counselor?

Students may stop by 122 Grange Building or call (814) 865-1773 to make an appointment or speak with their counselor. It

is important to make contact as early in the semester as possible.

Any issue important to students is important to MRC Counselors.

The Commission on Racial/Ethnic Diversity

The Commission for Women

The Commission on Lesbian, Gay, & Bisexual Equity

The Equal Opportunity Planning Committee

nn State's College of Engineering, established in

1896, has a long tradition as one of the country's

leading educators of engineers.

Approximately one in fifty engineers in the United States with a bachelor's degree in engineering earned that degree from Penn State. The College of Engineering offers a traditional curriculum combined with innovative programs designed to broaden the experience of undergraduate students. The internationally known faculty work with undergarduate and graduate students in the

classroom and engage in research in both theoretical and experimental areas. A variety of research activities and projects give Penn State students hands-on experience and a headstart in the job market. Underpinning the engineering curriculum are strong ties with th industry, including a broadly based Cooperative Education program for undergraduates and an active alumni association.

 

MEP Selection menu

 

 

 

Penn State's Women in Engineering Program (WEP) serves a community of approximately 1,350

women graduate and undergraduate students and faculty in the College of Engineering WEP

focuses on retention, recruitment, and overall climate enhancement activities. The WEP

community includes women of all ethnic and racial backgrounds encompassing thirteen

engineering departments and programs at Penn State's University Park Campus and thirteen

Campuses of the additional campuses throughout the state.

Working with corporations, engineering alumnae/i, University offices, faculty, and students, WEP

has initiated and supports a variety of targeted activities, including departmentally based

mentoring projects, hands-on equipment classes, career development workshops, orientation for

incoming women at all levels, and individual contact. Successful initiatives are extended to

students and faculty throughout the college.

Industry and Penn State engineering alumnae/i are crucial partners in WEP, providing role

models, advice, job experience, and support. Twice yearly, the Dean's Advisory Committee for

the Women in Engineering Program, made up of leaders in a variety of engineering and

engineering-related professions, meets to evaluate WEP activities. WEP also works closely with

ECSEL (the Engineering Coalition of Schools for Excellence in Education and Leadership),

Engineering Instructional Services, the Minority Engineering Program, the Learning Factory, and

the University Libraries to achieve its mission.

An important current objective is to increase scholarship, fellowship, and programmatic

resources to help women students succeed in realizing individual and civic potential, earn an

engineering degree, and enter the engineering profession.

 

 

 

Stanford

 

Stanford Center for Chicano Research. This center started in 1980 promotes cross-diciplinary research on Mexican American and other Latino Communities in the US. See Stanford Appendix

 

Institute For Research on Women and Gender This center is a reseach center that was established in 1974 it has books and tapes available and does lectures and work with affiliated scholars.

 

Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305

President of the Institution:

Gerhard Casper

http://www.stanford.edu

 

http://www-portfolio.Stanford.edu:8050/documents/president/951004affaction.html

 

Contact

Geneva Lopez

Assistant Dean

650/725-2536

650/723-3235 (FAX)

geneva.lopez@forsythe.stanford.edu

 

 

Stanford is marked by a rich diversity of academic achievements and interests, artistic and athletic accomplishments, and ethnic and social backgrounds. As a private institution, Stanford University has considerable freedom in the pursuit of its educational goals and ideals. These include recognition of its responsibility to find and educate the leaders of the future in a diverse and complex society. To do this, the nation's demographic diversity must find a presence on campus.

In a 1902 address that formally amended the Founding Grant, Jane Stanford stressed that the moving spirit of the founders of the university was "love of humanity and a desire to render the greatest possible service to mankind." She said: "The University was accordingly designed for the betterment of mankind morally, spiritually, intellectually, physically, and materially. The public at large, and not alone the comparatively few students who can attend the University, are the chief and ultimate beneficiaries of the foundation." The university's "chief object" was to be "the instruction of students with a view to producing leaders and educators in every field of science and industry." The university initially charged no tuition to, Mrs. Stanford said, "resist the tendency to the stratification of society, by keeping open an avenue whereby the deserving and exceptional may rise through their own efforts from the lowest to the highest station in life. A spirit of equality must accordingly be maintained within the University."

 

Stanford continues to pursue that spirit today. In its admissions process, for example, it looks for multi-dimensional aspects of being "deserving and exceptional," and through admissions and financial aid to "resist the tendency to the stratification of society." Stanford faculty, staff, and students participate in the effort to sustain and strengthen diversity on campus. Programs ranging from symposia, interdisciplinary research opportunities, and social and cultural events are offered by individual campus units or offices and student organizations, often working collaboratively.

 

The wide array of experiences, values and perspectives at Stanford provides a valuable educational experience in itself. Through a combination of diversity and excellence in its intellectual, human, and physical resources, Stanford offers one of the world's finest academic environments for students to pursue their educational goals.

 

 

 

Tulane University

 

Tulane University

2223 University Center

New Orleans, LA 70118

President of the Institution:

Dr. Eamon M. Kelly

http://www.tcs.tulane.edu

 

Contact

Carolyn Barber-Pierre

Associate Dean of Students/Director of Multicultural Affairs

504-865-5181

504-862-8795 (FAX)

pierre@mailhost.tcs.tulane.edu

 

Tulane University is a four year, private institution located in the racially and culturally diverse city of New Orleans, Louisiana. The student population is 11,000 with a minority population of about 1,800. Ethnicity's include: African American, Latino, Asian American, and Native Americans are represented in our 11 undergraduate, graduate and professional schools.

The University is committed to providing a culturally diverse environment through its various interdisciplinary curricular and ethnic studies programs, and through its support services and offices, including the Office of Multicultural Affairs, Center for International Students& Scholars, Educational Resource Center, Amistad Research Center, and Athletic Student Life Office. These specific offices are responsible for providing programs and support services that create a strong sense of community for their targeted minority groups. In addition, they promote personal growth and development through defined goals and programs addressing the unique needs and concerns of each group they serve.

Tulane College and Newcomb College, the two coordinate liberal arts colleges of Tulane University, offer programs of study leading to the Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sciences, or the Bachelor of Fine Arts. Students may design their own interdisciplinary majors with special approval.

The School of Engineering offers programs leading to the Bachelors of Science in biomedical, chemical, civil, computer, environmental, electrical and mechanical engineering and computer science. Engineering Science may also be pursued. The School of Architecture combines professional preparation and creative theory in the five year design-oriented Bachelor Science in Management majoring in either accounting, finance, general business, or marketing through the A.B. Freeman School of Business. Four year programs (also with first two years in liberal art and sciences) are offered in exercise science and sports management through the University College.

Tulane College (for men) and Newcomb College (for women) share the same campus, faculty and curriculum, but have separate advising and special program offerings. The Schools of Engineering, Business and Architecture are coeducational. Tulane operates under a two semester calendar.

special collections in the University libraries include the William Ransom Hogan Jazz Archive, considered to be the finest in America, and the rare books, manuscripts, and artifacts of the Latin American Library and the Amistad Research Center, one of the largest repositories specializing in the history of African-Americans.

The 110 acre Tulane campus, located in the residential Uptown neighborhood of New Orleans, across from Audubon Park, combines a unified campus setting with proximity to the downtown area. Undergraduate students come from all areas of the United States, with about 55 percent from outside the South, and from more that 90 foreign countries. A variety of activities are available, including progrograsmming sponsored by 25 multi-ethnic or diversity student organizations; events programmed through CACTUS, a volunteer community service organization, and drawing internationally renowned figures to the campus.

Historical Overview:

Founded in 1834 as the Medical College of Louisiana, Tulane University as we know it today has evolved from an ante-bellum institution founded solely to educate white citizens to one of the more diverse Research I institutions. This evolutionary path has been marked by the turbulence of dismantling segregation, the Civil Rights era, implementation of affirmative action, and the present trend toward the "management of diversity." While Tulane's early responses through these stages of developing racial equity were quite muted when compared to those of schools such as Berkeley, Columbia, Alabama, and Mississippi, Tulaneís brief encounter with the culminating events of late sixties' radicalism was both hailed as an overdue moment of moral awakening and condemned as a nihilistic descent into "campus unrest." Although Tulane was the last of the South's private research institutions to lower racial barriers and admit students of color as a result of a suit (1963) that included pitting alumni against the pro-desegregation administration, no one doubted that admission of the first black students represented a significant turning point in the school's history.

Led since 1981 by a president praised by some as fair and progressive and derided by others as too liberal, Tulane, under Eamon Kelly, quietly became a maverick institution concerning matters of race relations and cultural diversity. Hastening the slow progress toward racial equity, Kelly has been a proponent of the commitment to principles of fairness and equity in admissions and in the hiring of faculty and staff. Kelly has used the power of persuasion and the power of appointment of senior positions to foster the expansion of programs, activities, and organizations geared toward the academic and social support of multi-ethnic and international students on Tulane's campus. The process of institutional change has been steady, but only history will determine whether the institution has been truly "transformed."

The following outline of the history of cultural diversity at Tulane University since 1982 serves as an opportunity to lay the foundation for a case study in institutional transformation. The process at Tulane was not necessarily "by the book," but, arguably, was successful as judged by the increase in African American faculty, students, and professional staff over the course of a fifteen-year period. Indeed, Tulane is (statistically, at least) one of the most diverse institutions of its kind in the country.

Evidence of curriculum change is identified in the section on curriculum transformation addresses the academic offerings that arose from the ASCEPT project, which was supported by the Foundation in a separate grant, and from the establishment of a minor in African and African Diaspora studies. Other institutional changes are noted in the following discussion, and each deserves detailed analysis in its own right. The material presented in the following pages, however, does suggest a direction and a set of issues.

The depth of change at Tulane is indeed great; yet even in recent years, intimations of unease with change do surface, usually in tandem with larger institutional issues. For example, far-reaching initiatives put forth in 1990 for more aggressive recruitment and hiring of minority faculty and staff encountered passionate opposition articulated in terms of academic freedom and institutional governance. In the past two years, Tulane's engagement with the city's entirely African American public housing population has stirred (less fervent) concern about the universityís mission in some quarters.

An exploration of the intersection of these issues, some of which characterize higher education generally, with the evolution of the place of African Americans and other underrepresented groups at Tulane would provide a unique perspective on higher education and on the national assessment of the role of race in America.

 

 

 

 

 

U C Irvine

 

SCHOLARSHIPS)

Welcome to the MINORITY SCIENCE PROGRAMS

(M.S.P.)

University of California, Irvine, School of Biological Sciences

The Minority Science Program in Biological Sciences is an

orchestrated effort by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and

the School of Biological Sciences at UC Irvine to increase the

number of US underrepresented groups in biomedical research

careers.

MSP participants benefit from early exposure, continuous research

training and faculty mentoring. Support is also provided through

paid summer and year-round research internships, access to the

latest computer technology, tutoring, academic advising, scientific

writing and participation at national conferences.

Furthermore, MSP has established a campus wide, regional and

national network of committed faculty and resource programs to

facilitate the transition from high school through community college,

baccalaureate and master's degrees to Ph.D. careers in biomedical

research. Independent of your educational standing, I invite you to

explore the following MSP chart and its links to a Ph.D. in the

exciting and rewarding world of biomedical research!

University of California, Irvine

Irvine, CA

92697

President of the institution:

Laurel Wilkening

www.uci.edu

 

Contact

Cathy Kawasaki Oda

Senior Compliance Analyst

814-824-4331

714-824-4350(Fax)

kawasaki@uci.edu

 

THE MOST IMPORTANT AND SUCCESSFUL ASPECTS OF OUR CAMPUS

DIVERSITY INITIATIVE

 

The campus diversity initiative which started two and a half years ago has always

been an "inclusive" and a "grassroots" effort guided by an ad hoc work group, and

with the full support of the Chancellor. The goal has been to reach out continually

to all members of the campus population through a diversity strategic planning

process. Faculty, staff, students, and administrators are all participants in the

process. Diversity programs that are being coordinated and implemented today are

a result of this collaborative process. The most significant accomplishment is the

design and implementation of the Chancellor's Campus-Community Council, which

consists of staff, student, and faculty representatives from various departments

across campus. The mission of the Council is to ensure that diversity is considered a

central element in all aspects of curriculum, operations, recruitment, and

community. Among many other projects being undertaken by the Council are the

diversity lecture series, informal discussion groups, and a Campus Community Day.

The Chancellor's Campus-Community Council has been our most successful effort,

based on the belief that organizational change will occur when there is support,

discussion, and undertanding of diversity and multiculturalism at the leadership

level. The Council is providing that input to the Chancellor, the Cabinet, and top

managers and leaders at UCI. The values of diversity and multiculturalism are

blending with UCI organizational culture. This process needs identification and

implementation of programs, strategies to keep the diversity alive. Synergy and

unity are helping UCI create a "real" multicultural and educational environment.

This is particularly essential to UCI given that 66% of our first year students are

Asian Pacific American.

 

 

 

 

 

UC Berkeley

 

President of the Institution:

Robert M. Berdahl

<Picture>

http://www.berkeley.edu

 

 

Contact

Sunny Merik

University Communications

510-643-8012

(FAX)

smm@pa.urel.berkeley.edu

 

 

As a world class university, Berkeley recognizes its responsibility to provide both symbolic leadership and concrete examples of what constitutes a "higher" education.

Since the early 1980s, cultural and ethnic diversity has been nurtured on this campus. Leading scholars, including Clark Kerr, former UC President and the first chancellor of Berkeley, viewed the university's diversity efforts as a great experiment to determine if excellence and diversity could coexist and enrich the campus. The record shows the experiment was successful.

As former Chancellor Chang-Lin Tien said during his final year in office, "Diversity adds vitality to our campus. It brings greater breadth and depth to our teaching, research, and public service, and it better prepares our students for life outside the Ivory Tower."

In today's world, a monocultural education is simply inadequate for life and service in a multicultural society. To educate citizens to function successfully in the 21st century, Berkeley actively encourages diversity within the staff, the faculty and student body, the curriculum, the campus groups and service organizations

 

 

UC San Bernadino

 

 

In our commitment to the furthering of knowledge and fulfilling

our educational mission, California State University, San

Bernardino seeks a campus climate that welcomes, celebrates,

and promotes respect for the entire variety of human experience.

In our commitment to diversity, we welcome people from all

backgrounds and we seek to include knowledge and values from

many cultures in the curriculum and extra-curricular life of the

campus community. Our commitment to work toward an

environment that values diversity requires that we create,

promote, and maintain activities and programs which further our

understanding of individual and group diversity. We will also

develop and communicate policies and promote values which

discourage intolerance and discrimination.

The concept and dimensions of diversity are to be advanced

and incorporated into every aspect of university activity,

including student life, the curriculum, teaching, programs, staffing,

personnel training practices, research, community services,

events, and all other areas of university endeavor.

Dimensions of diversity shall include, but are not limited to, the

following: race, ethnicity, religious belief, sexual orientation,

sex/gender, disability, socioeconomic status, cultural orientation,

national origin, and age.

The implementation of the Commitment to Diversity will rest

with the university as a whole. The president, in addition to a

personal commitment and involvement, may use the University

Diversity Committee, campus administrators, faculty, staff, and

students as well as other members of the campus community to

implement effectively the philosophy and intent of this statement.

California State University, San Bernardino shall maintain a

standing University Diversity Committee (UDC) which reports to

the university president. The UDC is composed of a cross

section of university representatives, including key administrators

appointed by the president, five faculty members appointed by

the Executive Committee of the Faculty Senate, four students

appointed by Associated Students, and four university

employees appointed by the Administrative Council. The length

of appointment will be staggered between one-year and

two-year terms. The president shall appoint the chair from the

UDC membership for a two-year term.

It is the mission of the UDC to foster an academic community

which reflects the values set forth in the Statement of

Commitment to Diversity.

The goals of the Committee are as follows:

Maintain the principles expressed in the Statement of

Commitment to Diversity.

Advise the CSUSB president on all matters and issues of

diversity.

Facilitate and promote ongoing opportunities for public

discussion relating to diversity.

Promote the enhancement of educational programs to

reflect pluralistic values and goals.

Collect, assess, and disseminate data on campus climate,

attitudes toward diversity, and group interactions.

Create an environment which fosters behaviors that model

an appreciation of diversity.

Promote the development and communication of policies

and procedures for seeking redress as a means of

resolving disputes and conflicts.

Review the Committee goals and objectives, establish

short-term goals, and revise long-term goals on an annual

basis.

Report annually on the work of the Committee and the

progress made toward the stated goals.

 

Organization of the UDC

The University Diversity Committee includes four subcommittees which

address specific items which are brought to the attention of the main

committee. Much of the work of the UDC would not be possible but for the

additional time and work of each of these committees.

Steering Subcommittee

Description:

Handles administrative details, recording minutes,

demonstrations, inviting speakers, and taking care of items

when the committee cannot meet.

Awareness/Staff Development Subcommittee

Description:

Conducts awareness and development activities for staff and

faculty; conducts workshops and previews films and other

curricular materials for purchase by the committee.

Diversity/Strategic Plan Liaison Subcommittee

Description:

 

Events Subcommittee

Description:

Previews requests for grants before consideration by the

committee and makes initial recommendations for all grants;

organizes and conducts major events of the University

Diversity Committee, including panel discussions, speakers,

film series, and similar programs.

Homepage Subcommittee

Description

Created to explore the feasibility of developing a Web Home

Page for the University Diversity Committee. The UDC

continues to maintain this project to increase the visibility of

campus activities and to provide a window for the promotion

of campus-wide diversity.

Annual Report 1997-1998

]

Memberships & Appointments

The University Diversity Committee (UDC) was co-chaired for the

third year by Frank L. Rincon, Vice President for Student Affairs and

Stuart Sumida, Associate Professor, Biological Sciences. The

Committee consisted of 21 members of which 3 were students, 5 were

faculty, 9 were administrators, and 4 were staff. Six new members

joined the UDC this year. The Steering Committee consisted of the

co-chairs, Frank L. Rincon and Stuart Sumida, Nancy Simpson,

Norma Romero and Sue Brotherton. This year's membership list is

attached.

Budget

The UDC Committee carried over $8,000 from 1996-97 and

expended $26,299.00. The balance of $1,945.00 will be carried over

for 1998-99

University Diversity Committee Actions/Activities/Projects

This year, the committee was very active and had numerous

accomplishments. The following is a list of university

diversity-related speakers, events, and programs that were

promoted or co-sponsored by the UDC.

. Center for Equity in Education

Director, Esteban Diaz, Department of Elementary and Bilingual Education,

880-5621.

Established by faculty of the School of Education to address issues related to

providing equitable education for students at all levels of the educational

system. Of special concern are public school students who are from different

linguistic and cultural backgrounds or who have special educational needs.

International Program

Developing intercultural communication skills and international understanding

among its students is a vital mission of the California State University. Since its

inception in 1963, the CSU International Program has contributed to this

effort by providing qualified students an affordable opportunity to continue

their studies abroad for a full academic year. Close to 11,000 CSU students

have taken advantage of this unique study option.

International Program participants earn resident academic credit at their CSU

campuses while they pursue full-time study at a host university or special study

center abroad. The International Program serves the needs of students in

more than 100 designated academic majors. Affiliated with 36 recognized

universities and institutions of higher education in 16 countries, the

International Program also offers a wide selection of study locales and learning

environments.

Further information is available at CSUSB International Program Site.

Women's Resource and Adult Re-entry Center

The center provides the campus community with resource publications,

information and programs on the educational, career, and personal needs and

interests of women. Assists students who have re-entered the university after

several years of life and work experience. Provides support groups,

information and peer support.

In coordination with staff and faculty, the center produces a series of Brown

Bag Lunch lectures, which feature faculty research and topics salient to

women and adult re-entry students. The center coordinates peer support

groups to encourage single parents, adult re-entry students, Hispanic women,

African-American women and women seeking empowerment. Interns from

the CSUSB Counseling center, in coordination with center staff, help facillitate

the support groups.

The center also showcases CSUSB student art, conducting shows and

receptions. Additionally, the center contains a library supported by faculty and

staff.

The center produces workshops to serve the needs of women and adults in

the campus community on topics such as computer technology for

empowering women and adult learners.

Finally, the center serves as an informal meeting place where students of

diverse backgrounds, needs and lifestyles congregate to socialize and

exchange ideas.

Multicultural Center

The Multicultural Center provides a place for students who feel they are

ethnically underrepresented on campus. All students are welcome and

encouraged to express and share their cultural differences, concerns and

goals. The center builds camaraderie and understanding among different

cultures by focusing on the similarities and appreciating the differences. It

stresses the concept that learning on campus is not confined to the classroom.

The center hosts a variety of lectures and round table discussions involving

faculty, staff and students. Many of the discussions center on current issues of

concern to the student body. An African-American men's support group was

coordinated by center staff.

The center sponsors a variety of cultural festivals throughout the year and

hosts several multicultural art exhibits. Major events have included Culture

Fest, Thanksgiving lunch fests, Black History Month festivities, St. Patrick's

Day and Easter festivities, and a Cinco de Mayo Celebration. The center has

run live music series featuring student groups. The center also has

co-sponsored the Latino Graduation Reception and the African-American

Graduation Baccalaureate.

Students from various cultures utilize the center for weekly and special

meetings, to co-sponsor ethnic programs and to network, evidence of the

comfort they find within the center.

Student Affirmative Action

The Student Affirmative Action (SAA) Program is designed to motivate and

enhance student awareness about seeking a post-secondary education. The

program targets middle school students through Project UPBEAT (University

Preparation by Early Academic Training). Project UPBEAT's objective is to

provide an educational, college-oriented program to students and parents.

Primary emphasis of the program is to increase the overall college awareness

and increase the number of underrepresented ethnic groups pursuing a college

education. Project UPBEAT participants are likely to be regularly admissible

to four-year universities upon high school graduation. Students are invited to

the campus for tours, CSUSB faculty presentations, and special events. The

program also focuses on parent participation by providing workshops and a

summer Parent Institute.

 

 

 

 

 

U Mass Boston

 

 

Contact

Esther Kingston-Mann

Director, Center for Improvement of Teaching

617-287-6543

617-287-6511 (FAX)

kingstonmann@umbsky.cc.umb.edu

 

 

UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AT BOSTON

History and Steps in Building the Diversity Initiative*

 

In May, 1991 a coalition of faculty, students, and staff at the University

of Massachusetts at Boston won approval for a university-wide diversity

requirement that defines diversity in terms of race, gender, social class,

culture, age, disability, and sexual orientation.

While some schools aim to prepare students for a wider life of social

encounters after they graduate, students at UMass/Boston encounter a

"wider life" everyday in their classrooms. The common experience of

diversity shared by members of the university community turned out to be

of decisive importance for the politics of curriculum change.

The Politics of Diversity

The UMass/Boston struggle for a university-wide diversity requirement

began in 1989, when the faculty-based Center for the Improvement of

Teaching brought together a dozen teachers and students who wanted to make

issues of multiculturalism more central to the university curriculum.

Among the first to join were the African-American chair of the Black

Studies Department, the director of the Disabled Students Center, the

first faculty member in the Department of English ever to teach a course

on homosexuality in Western literature, a female music student of Irish

working class background, an Asian-American faculty member in the American

Studies Program, and an African-American female student majoring in

economics.

The Diversity Working Group that emerged from these early meetings was

open to all members of the university community. From the outset, critics

were invited to join; the initial goal was outreach and

constituency-building. Between 1989 and 1991, two campus-based

conferences and 35 faculty forums were organized with a focus on "teaching

about differences." Here, again, the diversity of the faculty and its

commitment to teaching came into play. When state-imposed budget cuts

made it impossible to hire outside experts to organize discussions of

diversity-related topics, UMass/Boston faculty members drew on their own

scholarship and experience and invested their time in presenting workshops

on "Disability Studies and the Liberal Arts Curriculum," "Helping Diverse

Students to Improve Quantitative Skills," and "Anguish as a Second

Language." By the fall of 1990, more than 300 faculty members, students

and staff had participated in these on-campus activities.

From the outset, students played an active role in the UMass/Boston

initiative. They turned out to be particularly good at educating their

teachers about the effects on their learning of the presence - or absence

- of academic work on race, class, gender, sexual orientation, disability,

age, and culture. The students also frequently expressed astonishment at

faculty interest in student perspectives on the learning process. One

African-American student said: "I've been waiting all my life for someone

to ask me questions like this!"

By spring 1990, a group of students (working with the Director of the

Women's Studies Program) had produced a video entitled "Acknowledge the

Other One: Diversity Issues at University of Massachusetts at Boston."

The pain and honesty of the student testimonies it contained moved many

previously uncommitted faculty members to recognize that diversity might

not yet play a significant enough role in the university curriculum. And

in the fall of 1990, the student-run Center for Educational Rights

gathered 600 student signatures on a petition in support of the proposed

requirement.

Avoiding Political Correctness

The definition of diversity adopted by the Diversity Working Group

reflected the work of such anthropologists as Ward Goodenough, who has

argued that each of us possess a number of cultures: we are members of a

particular generational cohort, social class, race, and gender, and we

possess a particular sexual orientation and degree of ability or

disability. In different settings, one or more of these "cultures" may

come into play. In proposing an inclusive definition of diversity,

proponents of change invited students, faculty, and staff to perceive and

understand diversity not as a program advocated by a minority of "others,"

but as a recognition of the range of differences that are shared by

members of the university community.

By April 1991, the proposal had won majority support from the faculty in

each of the university's colleges. On May 8, 1991, the university's

highest governance body approved it by a 10-2 vote. The diversity

requirement is scheduled to go into effect in September 1992.

Diversity Makes a Difference

The history of multicultural curriculum initiatives at UMass/Boston

carries three important lessons about the political correctness

controversy, and, more importantly, about curricular reform itself.

- A faculty that is relatively diverse is likely to recognize the academic

legitimacy and importance of a wide variety of cultural perspectives.

- A personnel process that rewards faculty members who take teaching

seriously will encourage them to invest time and energy in re-thinking and

re-organizing courses to take account of multicultural issues.

- A diverse student body may find a greater emphasis on diversity long

overdue rather than "novel" or "alien."

As UMass/Boston moves on to the difficult task of implementing its new

diversity proposal, it is by no means certain that the civility of the

earlier process will persist. But even if the worst is yet to come, the

UMass/Boston story nevertheless suggests a new angle of approach to the

challenge of multiculturalism. A recent story in The Boston Globe

suggested that the solution lies in a "trickle down" process from the

nation's most prestigious universities to their more backward

counterparts. But the UMass/Boston story suggests that The Globe has it

upside down. The real issue is not how to resolve the currently

fashionable debate over political correctness, but how to respond

creatively to the realities of diversity. And in meeting this challenge,

it may be precisely the less widely recognized universities that have the

most to teach.

* Edited from Kingston-Mann, Esther. "Multiculturalism Without Political

Correctness: The University of Massachusetts/Boston Model." Boston

Review, 1992, May-August, pp. 30-31.

 

Institute for Asian American Studies 

The Institute for Asian American Studies was established in 1993 with support from Asian American communities and direction from the state legislature. The Institute brings together resources and expertise within both the university and the community to conduct research on Asian Americans; to expand Asian American studies in the curriculum; and to strengthen the community development capacity of Asian Americans. As part of the network of campus-based centers and institutes, the Institute for Asian American Studies plays a role comparable to the Trotter Institute and the Gaston Institute which work closely with and for the state's Black and Latino communities and contribute to UMass Boston's unique, multicultural research capacity. The Institute also taps resources within the statewide UMass system, including the campuses in Amherst, Lowell, Dartmouth, and Worcester. 

 

 

 

 

U Mass Lowell

 

One University Ave.

Lowell, MA 01854

Contact

Lan Pho

Director - Center for D & P

(987)934-4335

(978)934-3084 (FAX)

Lan_Pho@uml.edu

HISTORICAL OVERVIEW

Located in historic Lowell, Massachusetts, a city immersed in more than 175 years of immigrant traditions, the University of Massachusetts Lowell covers three campuses along the scenic Merrimack River. In 1997, enrollment exceeded 13,000, with approximately 15 percent of the student body consisting of African, Latino, Asian and Native Americans, along with more than 450 students from over 60 countries. The University offers undergraduate and graduate degree programs in business, education, engineering and technology, nursing, liberal arts, music and the pure and applied sciences. A wide range of continuing education programs serve individuals who cannot attend classes full-time.

The four strategic priorities of the University of Massachusetts Lowell include a commitment to sustain industrial development, reaffirm teaching and learning, pioneer the interactive university and embrace diversity and pluralism. This context provided framework for the University to establish a Council on Diversity and Pluralism in December 1994, to celebrate cultural differences, encourage and facilitate discussion of issues relating to equity and excellence in higher education, and to recognize diverse teaching methodologies, learning abilities, and lifestyles among faculty, staff and students. The Council also makes recommendations to the Chancellor and the Provost on affirmative action and equal opportunity programs. The Council is composed of five task forces: Research and Assessment, Recruitment and Retention, Campus Life, Academic Climate, and Community Collaboration. Membership is open to all students, staff and faculty.

Under direction of the Council, the Center For Diversity and Pluralism facilitates research, sponsors conferences, and conducts seminars to bring new perspectives to existing views on diversity. The Center also serves as a clearinghouse to collect and disseminate data and research literature on diversity issues in higher education and at the workplace. Each year, the Center fully or partially funds more than 20 programs through Diversity Grants, conducts a series of development seminars for faculty and staff, sponsors survey research on enrollment and retention, assists student organizations with program development and leadership-building skills and coordinates outreach programs at area middle and high schools.

 

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

The Council celebrates many campus initiatives and successful programs, ongoing studies of enrollment, retention and graduation of students of color, a network of 29 public higher education institutions in Massachusetts, numerous outreach programs with area public schools and community organizations and the development of additional resources for program implementation. Here are several highlights:

Diversity Seed Grants: Each July, the Council on Diversity and Pluralism funds 20 to 40 grants to support research, curriculum enrichment, professional development, student activities and community collaboration.

Diversity Research Fellows: Each spring, research fellowships of up to $1,500 each may be awarded to interested faculty, staff and students to conduct new, or to extend on-going, scholarly research projects focusing on diversity in higher education.

Diversity Literature Collection: More than 200 items — books in print, magazine articles, ERIC documents, monographs, conference and working papers, videos and more — are now available to the general public through the inter-library loan process among area communities.

Diversity Video Collection: A collection of videos (most listings include a description, running time, year of production and producer) are currently housed in the Center for Diversity and Pluralism, 336 McGauvran, South Campus.

A Network of UMass Lowell Researchers on Diversity Issues: In view of the rich and diverse research interests and studies conducted by many faculty and staff at UMass Lowell, a new committee is forming a network to explore diversity research on campus.

Diversity and General Education Requirement: Because graduates of UMass Lowell will enter a diverse world and become members of a global economy, Executive members of the Council on Diversity and Pluralism feel strongly that a diversity course should be a requirement of the General Education core curriculum. Under discussion now is the best way to implement this idea.

Directory of Diversity Initiatives: The Directory of Diversity Initiatives , updated each spring, summarizes the more than 200 initiatives that take place at UMass Lowell each year. Within the Directory are descriptions of the offices, programs and activities, funding sources, targeted populations and names of the contact person or principal investigator. Also listed are more than 50 courses, offered through the seven Colleges at the University, that deal with some aspect of diversity.

OUTREACH PROGRAMS

New Horizons: A college preparatory program at Lowell High School funded by the Higher Education Coordinating Council, New Horizons annually prepares some 70 to 90 economically-disadvantaged and first-generation college-bound students for admission to, and completion of, college studies in the engineering, teaching, health and business professions. Contact Coordinator Suzanne Gamache at (978) 441-1163 for details.

College Prep: The College Prep Program is a partnership between the University of Massachusetts Lowell and Lawrence High School. The program offers support activities and workshops to some 200 junior and senior high school students during the school year and in the summer. Contact Hector Torres at the College of Education, West Campus (978) 934-4668 for more information.

Lowell-Asia: Lowell-Asia is a collaboration between the University of Massachusetts’ Center for Diversity and Pluralism and the Bartlett, Butler and Daley middle schools in Lowell. It is designed to increase awareness and sensitivity to the cultural values, religious beliefs and lifestyles of Southeast Asians who live in Lowell and to validate the cultural heritage and family values of Southeast Asian students. For details on upcoming workshops, please call (978) 934-4335.

The Demonstration School: Since 1990, the UMass Lowell College of Education, in collaboration with the Lowell Public Schools, has operated the Demonstration School as a model for the best in educational practice in language acquisition and multicultural education. Children from native English-, Spanish- and Khmer-speaking homes work and play together in a mixed-age, developmental learning environment where children’s languages and cultures are valued and form the basis for learning. For more information, contact Director Ann Benjamin at (978) 934-4600 (West Campus).

Community Seminars on Diversity and Democracy: Designed as a platform to allow public school teachers, community leaders and students from the University and high schools in Lowell and Lawrence to gather and share their knowledge and to learn from each other’s experience with Diversity and Democracy.

The Internship Program at DuPont Merck: The Diversity Internship Program was developed in 1995 to provide minority students in science and technology an opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills at the work site. More than a dozen students majoring in Biology and Chemistry were identified and placed with DuPont Merck, a pharmaceutical research company located in Billerica, MA.

EVENTS

Diversity Symposia : Each spring, the Center for Diversity and Pluralism hosts a day-long symposium to provide a forum to discuss the various aspects of diversity in higher education and at the workplace. Participants include faculty, staff and students from the University of Massachusetts Lowell and other institutions of higher learning. In addition to presentations of work being done at UMass Lowell, presenters from different campuses speak about programs and projects within their communities. Please call (978) 934-4342 for more information.

Annual Summer Institute for Faculty: Faculty members meet for two days each June to review their curriculum and instruction and to develop new strategies to respond to demographic changes of student enrollment. The Summer Institute for Faculty provides participants with an opportunity to discuss and share knowledge about different cultures, values and beliefs and how these aspects of diversity affect the way they teach and the way students learn.

Annual Summer Institute for Staff: A continuing series of development activities conducted by the Center for Diversity and Pluralism to enhance efficacy in working with an increasingly diverse student population. Usually held each August.

Diversity Dinner Discussions: A forum for faculty and staff from UMass Lowell and other institutes of higher learning. Held each spring and fall. Previous topics include: "Affirmative Action and the Structural, Historical Impediments to Equal Access in Hiring at Public and Private Institutions of Higher Education," "Race, Gender, and Language in Teaching Science" and "The Status of Minority Scholars in Higher Education Institutions."

FUTURE DIRECTIONS

The University’s goal continues to be a commitment to increase the enrollment of students from diverse populations through outreach programs at area high schools and in-service seminars and training for teachers, staff and counselors.

Today, UMass Lowell builds bridges and relationships with the surrounding community through celebrations like Black History Month, Asian American Heritage Month, Hispanic Heritage Month, Fear No People Week and dozens more.

Its five Council for Diversity and Pluralism Task Forces have targeted the following areas on which to focus in the coming year: Institutionalize diversity courses as part of the General Education Requirement; advocate adoption of a University-wide sexual harassment policy; create and monitor programs and activities that advocate inclusion and support of minority issues; continued collaboration with surrounding communities; support of linguistic minority students and programs; facilitate the gathering of pertinent data to assess progress relating to diversity and pluralism mission.

The Council will also continue to convey the importance of campus diversity initiatives by encouraging participation by faculty, staff, students and administration; review University policy and practice on admission and retention of ESL students; enlist Council members to assist with Search Committees and to establish a network of offices and individuals to address students’ needs and concerns relating to diversity.

By the turn of the century, the University expects to be recognized as a national leader in using diversity and pluralism to enrich learning, promote personal growth, build community and realize the social and economic potentials of the region’s people.

 

For more information, please visit the UMass Lowell Center for Diversity and Pluralism Home Page, part of the University’s Web Page @

www.uml.edu/centers/Diversity/,

or call (978) 934-4342.

"last changed on March 30, 1998

Dear Spencer,

Thanks for your inquiry.

Please send me a mailing address, I'll forward to you reading materials

about the Council and the Center for D&P at UML.

In a nut shell, CD&P is one of the four strategic councils at UML, it

is funded very modestly by the institution operating funds (i.e.

internal funding). We have a staff of one FT, two PTs and a couple of

work-study students.

Good luck with your internship at UO. Watch out for your spelling :)

Lan T. Pho, Ed.D.

 

 

 

UC Santa Cruz

 

Chicano Latino Student Life Resouce Center

 

Provides support for stundets research opportunities works with the local community works as a support reasource, does dialogues with grad students and faculty online research workshops, retreats mentorship for students adnd faculty, support groups and more.

 

Rape prevention education program.

This started in 1979 provides resources like videos and refrence materials counseling and puts on workshops and self defense courses.

 

African American Student Life Resouce and Cultural Center

 

This provides support for Arican American student to help them graduale and enter school as well. It helps to provide funding and services and facilities for collaborative efforts with other departments and divisions as well. They have a staff of 11.

Diversity Education Program throuhg EEO/AA

Mission: To educate the UCSC staff about issues of diversity and to rovide them with the toodkls to promote a more respectful and inculsive workplace projects include:

Diversity Dialogue groups- small groups that meet on a regular basis to talk listen and learn about the differences and fears that keep us appart. This builds trust and communication skills.

Brown Bag events

Education for campus units

Audio/Video Reccomendations.

 

( This is a really though out and amazing project and would be perfect to use as a model for creating a way to have a diversity agenda for faculty and staff)

Also this office has a detailed 90 minute diversity workshop plan found later in the report.

 

 

CREDE: Center for Research and Education Diversity and Excellence.

This is part of the center for applied linguistics it does research of indentifying and developing effefective educatioal practices for linguistic and cultural minorities. It is funded by the National Institute on the Education of At-Risk Students

Crede is in partnership with over 20 universities listed later in this report.

"last changed on September 19, 1997

The University of California, Santa Cruz Diversity Education Program provides diversity education for staff with the following mission:

To educate UCSC staff about issues of diversity (including, but not limited to, race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, disability, and class) and to provide them with the tools necessary to promote a more respectful and inclusive workplace.

The Diversity Education Program Includes

Brown Bag Events

Group of people

Education for Campus Units

Film

Diversity Dialogue Groups

Diversity Dialogue Group Leader Training

Diversity Matters

Diversity Education Program

University of California, Santa Cruz

141B Communications Building

Santa Cruz, CA 95064

Phone: (831) 459-5087

FAX: (831)459-2670

TDD: (831) 459-5011

gwenny@cats.ucsc.edu

 

Last updated June30, 1999

http://www2.ucsc.edu/diversity/

 

 

 

 

 

UC Davis

 

 

UC davis lgbt ctrhttp://lgbcenter.ucdavis.edu/about.htm

The LGBT Resource Center, serving all members of the Davis Community, offers a safe and supportive environment for learning about lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender individuals. The LGBT Resource Center contains a wealth of information and resourcesabout lesbian, gay, bisexual, and gender issues.

The Center's resources include:

A library of nearly 700 books and documents, most of which can be borrowed for 2 weeks for personal use.

Local and national newspapers and magazines including: The Advocate, Anything that Moves, Curve, Genre, Outword Magazine, OUT, and Transgender Tapestry.

A growing collection of videos, both for entertainment and education, which can be borrowed for 3 days.

Pamphlet racks, containing 100's of informational handouts on various subjects, events, and organizations.

A resource database and files on all of the local resources available to the LGBT community, including: health professionals, legal services, clubs, organizations and community contacts.

A clipboard Board space where people from the community may advertise events, services, spaces for rent, etc.

A newsgroup on the UCD computer system, for posting information relevant to the LGBT community of Davis

"news://news.ucdavis.edu/ucd.q-news"

Students who are studying lesbian, gay, bisexual, and gender issues, or are conducting research projects are invited to use the resources of the Center.

The Center can also serve as a meeting space for local organizations or support groups. Call the Center to reserve the space for your group or organization.

History of the LGBT Center:

The Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Resource Center opened on January 31, 1994. Its presence on the UC Davis campus was the result of a recommendation made by the Chancellor's Committee on Gay, Lesbian & Bisexual Issues in 1992. In the Fall of 1993, a group of students, staff and faculty convened to prepare the Center for its grand opening. On June 5, 1997, the Chancellor's Committee voted to add Transgender to its name and to the name of the Center. Volunteers from the Davis campus and community meet regularly to plan for future directions and current needs of the Center.

Anyone who is interested in promoting the success of the Center is welcome to participate on the Steering Committee. No experience is necessary, and all input is welcome. Call the Center at 752-2GLB for more information.

 

 

Cross cultural center This looks really cool

http://pubweb.ucdavis.edu/documents/ccc/Mission

 

Phone info web page stiull mostly undr construction but looks like it started to be really good 530752 4387

Chicana/Chicano Studies Major

College of Letters and Science

MAJORING IN CHICANA/CHICANO STUDIES provides an academic background in both Mexican-American and Latino cultures. This educational model incorporates the characteristics and values required by a multilingual, multicultural population of the United States and California. The major provides the skills to understand, appreciate, and respond constructively to the diversity as society changes in relation to its evolving ethnic and demographic composition.

Many students combine their studies to create double majors or minors in Chicana/Chicano Studies. Students can select a Social Sciences emphasis or a Humanities emphasis. Courses include history, social, political, psychological, educational, and economic experiences, other ethnic studies and women's studies, literature, the arts and an area emphasis. Both tracks accommodate student interests in bilingual/bicultural education, cultural centers, publishing, journalism, communications, community development, community or social services, or professional preparation leading to an advanced degree in law, medicine, or research and teaching in higher educational institutions.

Chicana/o Studies is the study of a people as diverse as they are similar. It includes the study of shifting social and ethnic borders between Chicanos, Latinos, and other underrepresented racial/ethnic groups in the U.S., including African-Americans, Puerto Ricans, Native Americans, and Asian Americans. These borders include connections between Chicanas/Chicanos and other communities of the Americas, Mexico, Caribbean, Central America and Latin Americas.

Courses promote knowledge of linguistic diversity, community concerns, and a dialogue that focuses on the culture, history, and social and political forces that shape the Chicano and Latino people. Special emphasis is placed upon the Mexican-American and Latino heritage in the southwestern United States including customs, language, art, music, food, architecture, and literature, but students also study the Native American, Mexican, Spanish, and Latino influences in California and other areas of the United States. Key events studied range from pre-Columbian to contemporary issues and personalities. General studies in American and European history provide the background to understand the present position of Chicanos and Latinos in California and the United States.

The CHICANO/LATINO STUDENT AFFAIRS OFFICE includes a Coordinator, counselors from the Learning Skills and Counseling Centers, peer advisors and major advisors. The office provides assistance with general academic advising, career goals, personal and social adjustment to college life and referral to appropriate offices. Additionally, the Coordinator serves as advisor to various student organization activities and cultural programs and provides meeting space for various student organizations. Prospective students are welcome to visit and talk with students, staff, and faculty in the Student Affairs Office and in the Chicana/o Studies Program. Annual activities include a fall quarter reunion, the spring quarter Semana de la Raza y Cinco de Mayo celebration and the Chicano/Latino Graduation Celebration.

Career Possibilities

Most careers will require an advanced degree, however, students with a Chicana/ Chicano Program bachelors degree can work in legislative, social services, or business offices, and in para-professional fields such as law, medicine and health sciences.

 

 

 

UC Santa Barbara

 

UCSB Center for black studies

 

http://omni.orda.ucsb.edu/cbs

Mission statement

The Center for Black Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, the only research center in the UC system devoted primarily to the study of people of African descent, appears uniquely qualified to enter current intellectual debates about the position and the experience of Blacks in Africa and in the Americas. The Center's research agenda should aim at unearthing the truths of life as experienced by millions of African, African-Americans and Caribbean Islanders, a reality which remains buried under the misconceptions of public opinion and slanted historical depiction.

Among other concerns, the Center for Black Studies must fulfill two primary goals.

(1) First, through its research and its public fora for colloquia, the Center must be a place to generate ideas on the culture, history, politics, economic factors, and educational matters that have affected the course of life for various Black populations over time. In addition, it must address pressing contemporary issues for Africans, African-Americans, and other diasporatic communities and people of color. It is also important to study the rapport between people of African descent, people of color, and other groups.

(2) Furthermore, the Center must possess more efficient tools to disseminate its research and the vigorous debates in which it engages. It is precisely with the aim of filling this startling void that a new publishing venture has been proposed by UCSB' s Center for Black Studies (

Over the past two years, the Center's Advisory Board members have drafted a new mission statement which emphasizes their strong support for retaining the Center's public/cultural mission while also re-directing the Center's agenda towards a more systematic effort to engage in research and publications. Though the Center's old mission statements also indicated a commitment to research and public service, documents supporting work done in these areas are lacking. We are now in the process of more systematically documenting past work done at the Center.

New Mission Statement

The Center's current mission is two-fold:

Academic Mission

To organize, promote and administer interdisciplinary research among faculty and students on the social, political, historical, cultural, and economic experiences of people of African descent. The Center is also committed to facilitating rapport between people of African descent and other people of color as well as with the US population in general.

To disseminate the research products and the ideas generated therein through a variety of mechanisms including, but not limited to working papers, edited volumes, special editions of journals, conferences and colloquia.

To provide training in interdisciplinary scholarship for faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates.

To house, support, and mentor dissertation fellows.

Public Mission

One goal of the Center's research agenda is active engagement in shaping and implementing public policy. Therefore, the academic mission is complemented by a public mission. The Center's research agenda uniquely positions us to provide a critical synthesis of issues of race, social equality and justice.

Furthermore, the broader public mission embraces a commitment to community collaboration. This collaboration can take on many forms, including: enhancing communication between the university and the community on issues of mutual concern; facilitating access for the community to university resources; participating in the development and implementation of community based educational and social initiatives; providing co-sponsorship for cultural activities on campus and in the community.

 

"

While the 1997/98 Advisory Board Committee is composed largely of UCSB faculty, we also have some local community members. The Center has been extremely fortunate in having so many committed and supportive individuals on its Advisory Board.

Campus

 

B. GRANTS SUBMITTED TO OUTSIDE AGENCIES

Michel, Claudine: The Study of Indigenous Religious Traditions: New Paradigms, Alternative Discourse. With Jacob Olupona and Ines Talamantez as Co-PIs.

This proposal seeks funding to enable us to carry out a series of planning meetings and research in Indigenous Religious Traditions. The overarching goal of the project is to develop new paradigms and discourses in the study and teaching of Indigenous Religious Traditions, especially in African Religions, Vodou and Native American Religions. In the next academic year, the three scholars involved in this project will conduct archival and library research. We will meet in Davis and Santa Barbara to formulate challenging research areas and to write a grant proposal, which will be submitted for extramural funding. The result of this preliminary research on new paradigms and discourses in Indigenous Religious Traditions will be published in journals and academic newsletters.

as intramural funding.

Ultimately, the Center administered seven different grants in 1997/1998. The Principal Investigators are faculty in the Department of Black Studies and a professor with emeritus status. The funding agencies are: UCSB College of Letters and Science, Undergraduate Mentorship Program; UCSB Office of the Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs, Project Crossroads; The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation; UC Office of the President, Urban Community-School Collaborative.

Smith, James: The Extent to Which a Community Learning Center Affects Positive Results in the Academic Performance of Students in Urban Community Schools.

For the past several years, the UC Urban Community-School Collaborative has increased the visibility of the University by combining forces with the community and with local schools. This alliance will promote the work that has already been started by a small volunteer group of lay people and a professional educator.

The proposal was designed to provide support services through Lucy’s Learning Center to enhance the academic performance of underachieving urban students, Pre-K through 8, from the Santa Barbara area. While the center currently provides a comprehensive list of services to its attendees, the main focus of this project is on assisting students with homework, hands-on activities in mathematics and science, and parenting sessions for adults (especially teenage parents). Emphasis is given to strengthening and reinforcing students’ understanding of fundamental concepts and approaches to problem solving in mathematics and science. Enrichment lessons are incorporated to stimulate quality thinking and reasoning. Where appropriate, cooperative learning strategies are employed

4. MINI-GRANTS AWARDED BY CBLS

Jones, Aaron: Alumni, Former UCSB AS President: Scholarship to participate as a first-hand observer/researcher in a research project on the current state of affairs in Haiti: Witness for Peace Delegation to Haiti January 8-22, 1998. The Center provided a modest contribution to complement Mr. Jones' grant from Witness for Peace. Mr. Jones went to Haiti with the delegation as a researcher examining the current political state of Haiti. II. Other Projects and Activities

 

A. Visiting Researcher

 

We have been exploring the idea of inviting researchers from other universities to utilize the Center's resources and to be in residence at UCSB. Dr. Jacob Olupona, faculty member at UC Davis, was the first to accept the invitation. He was in residence at the Center from late January to the end of July 1998, and we were able to write a grant proposal together (African Indigenous Religions), among other things. Having a senior scholar at the Center with whom to exchange ideas and seek advice was extremely beneficial for the Center and the projects we are working on.

Educational Opportunity Program & Education Program for Cultural Awareness, Presentations: Black Culture Week activities: Week-long activities observing and celebrating African American and Black Culture. Activities included various guest speakers, films, dance, arts & crafts, and food.

Chicano resource@ ctr

Since 1969, the Center for Chicano Studies at UCSB has served as the campus ORU for sponsored research in Chicana/Chicano Studies. Because the Center's origins were intricately bound to the larger Chicano student movement concerned with questions of community education and Chicano/Latino underrepresentation among undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty at the University of California, the mandate of the Center has traditionally embraced the development of programs aimed at addressing these concerns. Hence, the Center evolved into a unit that sought to develop faculty research initiatives in Chicana/o Studies and participate in the recruitment and retention of Chicano/Latino faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates as well as work with the larger Chicano/Latino community in the local area. To date, the Center for Chicano Studies is one of only two ORU's in the University of California system devoted to these goals.

"

http://www.chicst.ucsb.edu/

 

This site has been developed and is managed by Nancy Furlow. Comments or questions can be sent to

"mailto:ccs@omni.ucsb.edu"

Site last updated 11/4/98

CENTER FOR CHICANO STUDIES

Annual Report

1997- 1998

Denise A. Segura

Director

University of California

Santa Barbara, CA 93106-6040

(805) 893-3895

Fax: (805) 893-4446

report directors statement. The Director's Statement

I. Initial Goals

Since 1969, the Center for Chicano Studies at UCSB has served as the campus ORU for sponsored research in Chicana/Chicano Studies. Because the Center's origins were intricately bound to the larger Chicano student movement concerned with questions of community education and Chicano/Latino underrepresentation among undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty at the University of California, the mandate of the Center has traditionally embraced the development of programs aimed at addressing these concerns. Hence, the Center evolved into a unit that sought to develop faculty research initiatives in Chicana/o Studies and participate in the recruitment and retention of Chicano/Latino faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates as well as work with the larger Chicano/Latino community in the local area. To date, the Center for Chicano Studies is one of only two ORU's in the University of California system devoted to these goals.

II. Current Mission

The Center's current mission is to support a research infrastructure where Chicana/o Studies research at UCSB continues to develop national and international prominence. Attainment of this goal revolves around activities that bring together the small number of outstanding faculty who engage in Chicana/o Studies by strengthening the development of an interdisciplinary research program. One distinctive feature of the field of Chicana/o Studies is its intellectual mosaic that engages methodologies and theoretical concerns that traverse diverse social science and humanities disciplines. This cross-fertilization produces an interdisciplinarity that often challenges conventional epistemologies while creating knowledge grounded in the lived experiences of Chicano/Latino communities. Hence the Center's emphasis on faculty work groups, collaborative projects, lectures, symposium, and publications that reflect this set of concerns.

As part of advancing a national presence in Chicana/o Studies research the Center supports a Visiting Research Scholar and, with the Department of Chicano Studies, the Luis Leal Endowed Chair. The Visiting Research Scholar involves a national search which heightens awareness of the Center's research program by prominent scholars in the field. In addition, the Visiting Research Scholar is co-sponsored by an academic department and has a faculty recruitment potential. During 1997-98, the Visiting Research Scholar was Professor Ernesto Chavez, Assistant Professor of History, University of Texas at El Paso. The Luis Leal Endowed Chair in Chicano Studies is designed to cultivate new research initiatives and projects that foster collaboration between the Center and the Department of Chicano Studies faculty. The Luis Leal Endowed Chair and Professor of Chicano Studies is acclaimed literary critic, author and poetess, Maria Herrera-Sobek.

The Center prioritizes research initiatives and training activities for graduate and undergraduate students. Each grant processed through the Center typically offers support to at least one graduate student and often several undergraduates. Each year the Center invites all graduate students doing advanced (post M.A.) research in Chicana/o or Latina/o Studies to submit proposals for funding support. Typically six to eight projects are supported in amounts that range from $500 to $2,500. The Center also offers a limited amount of funding to students who have been invited to present Chicana/o or Latina/o Studies research at conferences. During 1997-98, the critical area of graduate student support broadened to include support of recruitment of outstanding students in Chicana/o and Latina/o studies. In the wake of SP 1 & 2 and Proposition 209, the Center's Advisory Committee created the Graduate Student Recruitment and Retention Program. In the pilot year (1998-99), $8,000 in funding was allocated to research assistantships for four 1998-99 graduate students: two in Sociology, one in Spanish & Portuguese, and one in English. Faculty in the pilot departments have indicated that this funding was critical to the successful recruitment of outstanding graduate students since it involves direct research assistant experience with faculty. The Center intends to broaden this program substantially during the next fiscal year

At the Center, the Undergraduate Student Internship Program continued to flourish during 1997-98. This program, co-ordinated by faculty and the Center's Community Outreach Assistant, strives to enhance the research skills of undergraduate students interested in Chicana/o Studies by providing stipends to work on faculty projects. In each of the three years of its existence, this program has supported eight-ten undergraduates each year. During 1997-98, the undergraduate interns and the coordinators successfully developed a Teen Center in neighboring Isla Vista which will officially open October 1, 1998. Throughout Summer 1998, the Teen Center offered tutorial workshops to junior high and high school students.

As the only organized research unit on this campus devoted to the study of Chicana/o and Latina/o populations, the Center is often called upon to provide information to local community agencies, community leaders, state and national entities as well as to the local campus community. Thus, public service forms an integral part of the Center's mission. Dissemination of sponsored research to meet this demand, however, poses an ongoing dilemma. The faculty who are involved in the Center attend numerous community functions and meet individually with community activists and leaders as part of the process of developing connections that can lead to extramural funding initiatives. In addition to the funding potential of such interactions, support of cultural and academic activities of constituencies which have played important roles in the development of Chicana/o Studies offer important opportunities to enhance UCSB-Community relationships.

Go to this site for ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

http://research.ucsb.edu/ccs/chart.htm

 

 

 

 

 

U.C.L.A.

 

Los Angeles, Ca. 90095-1361

President of the Institution:

Albert Carnesale

<Picture>

http://www.ucla.edu

 

Contact

Raymund Paredes

Vice Chancellor-Academic Development

310 206-7411

310 206-6030 (FAX)

Welcome to UCLA's Diversity webpage, a new resource for addressing issues of access and diversity and advancing UCLA's commitment to diversity during a time of change. The webpage has been designed to offer a focused presentation of the various diversity-related activities underway to ensure that UCLA maintain a diverse campus community. The diversity of our students, faculty, and staff is one of UCLA's defining characteristics and a source of our institution's vitatlity and strength.

A variety of efforts to protect and promote diversity are now being carried out at UCLA. New outreach initiatives at both the undergraduate and graduate levels are in development. UCLA is engaging in an ambitious campaign to address access, retention, and advancement issues for students, faculty, and staff.

A Letter from the Chancellor:

http://www.ucla.edu/home/welcome/chancellor/affirmative.html

 

 

My Findings atr UCLA include:

 

Asian American Studies Center

Center For African American Studies- this center " Investigates problems that have a bearing on the psychological social and economic wel being of persons of African American decent. It offers graduate scholorships and has a libreary as well as lectures other projects and collabvorations with community groups. The director is hired by the advisory committee made up of faculty appointed by a vice chancellor.

 

 

Chican Studies Research Center This promotes the study and dessemination of knoweledge on the existence of the people of mexican decent and other latinos in the united states. – The main focus here is on reseaerch thoery and sharing that with othe5r research institutions that are wqortking on similar issues

 

Center for the Study of Women This is primarily a research center that borrows peole from departments all over campus it administers grants works on developing curriculum and is overseen by a faculty advisory committee.

 

University of Arizona

 

Jennifer Aviles

CSW/DAC

University Services, 220

PO 210158

Tucson, AZ 85721-0158

 

President of the Institution:

Dr. Peter Likins

http://www.arizona.edu

 

http://w3.arizona.edu/~dac

 

Contact

Jennifer Aviles

Program Coordinator, Senior, Human Resources

520-621-8676

520-6213714 (FAX)

javiles@u.arizona.edu

The University of Arizona is committed to the pursuit of excellence in education; to generating and transmitting knowledge and thought; to developing skill and talents; to creating an environment where people of many characteristics, backgrounds, and experiences can offer their own unique contributions; and to affirming the value and dignity and respect of all members of the University Community. In an increasingly global environment, the excellence of The University of Arizona depends upon how well we capitalize on the diversity of our resources, especially human resources. Accordingly, we are committed to an intellectual environment of the highest standard which promotes in its policies, curricula, programs, daily activities, and celebrations the value of all members -- an inclusive, interactive, collegial, respectful, stimulating, pluralistic, multi cultural, international arena for the exchange of knowledge and perspectives. By valuing, supporting, and celebrating our uniqueness and oneness, The University of Arizona goes beyond the bounds of discipline and culture to stimulate education excellence.

The University of Arizona invites you to visit the website of its Diversity Action Council, which is http://w3.arizona.edu/~dac. At this site you will find the Diversity Action Plan adopted in September 1990. The site includes lists of diversity related resources at The University of Arizona, a summary of progress, and other information of interest. One of the programs recently listed is the Minority Achievement Program. Conceived in 1988, the program was designed to increase the involvement of minority staff in university task forces and committees. It now complements and further strengthens career development opportunities for staff. By targeting minorities, MAP begins to address the problem of under-representation in leadership positions. MAP is one part of a larger vision of development programs that encourages all University staff to seek opportunities for leadership and achievement.

University of Arizona

What is the Diversity Action Council? •What is the Diversity Action Plan? •What is the Mission and Vision of the Diversity Action Council? •What are some of the Council's Projects? •Who are the members of the DAC? •How does one become a member of the Council? •Can I be involved without being a Council member? •How can I get more information about the Council? •Tell me more about the DAC Co-Sponsorship Program •Diversity Action Council Documents and Information •Application for Membership •On Campus Links of Interest •Further Links of Interest

What is the Diversity Action Council?

The Diversity Action Council (DAC) is an advisory group to the President. It was created in 1990 to oversee the implementation of the Diversity Action Plan, a document prepared in Academic Year 1989-90 and submitted to Henry Koffler, UA President, on May 11, 1990.

What is the Diversity Action Plan?

The Diversity Action Plan is a document which outlines strategies for valuing the contributions of diverse populations, recognizing changes in societal and workforce demographics, and enhancing campus climate. The Plan includes an all-inclusive definition of "diversity", a mission statement, and 14 goals grouped into six areas: assessment, information, training, curriculum, events, and program evaluation.

What is the Mission and Vision of the Diversity Action Council?

Diversity Action Council Mission Statement

The mission of the Diversity Action Council is to actively promote an increased awareness of and a shared commitment to inclusiveness and diversity throughout The University of Arizona. The Council, which is appointed by the president, is representative of the greater campus community and functions in an advisory role to the Office of the President and the Administration.

Diversity Action Council Vision Statement

The Diversity Action Council assumes a leadership role in the development of a university community that recognizes the inherent value of diversity; respects the multiple voices of our community; and is guided by the community's collective experience and wisdom. The Council envisions a campus community where equity is assured in all facets of the academic endeavor including research and scholarship, curriculum and teaching, enrollment and employment, and the allocation of resources.

To carry out the mission and vision, the Council has three major committees:

•Education/Awareness whose goal is to sponsor, support, and/or promote programs which build individual awareness and understanding of diversity-related issues among students, staff, and faculty. •Policy and Practice whose goal is to advise the UA administration regarding policy and practice issues which impact campus diversity. •Co-Sponsorship whose goal is to be responsive to and supportive of initiatives and programs of campus units that support increasing awareness and understanding of diversity related issues, increasing access to events by diverse populations, and creati ng positive social change within the University and the community related to diversity issues.

What are some of the Council's projects?

During recent years, the DAC has sponsored several projects in order to fulfill its mission. Among the Council's activities have been:

* coordination of a diversity segment within the 1994-95 and 1995-6 Fall Family Weekend

* sponsorship for the fourth year of a Diversity Action Grants Program and for the second year a co-sponsorship program that fund a variety of projects that create and develop diversity-related programs and services for students and faculty

* co-sponsorship with several University units of Daughters on Campus Day, a local celebration that is part of a wider national effort titled, "Take Our Daughters to Work Day" held each year on the fourth Thursday in April

* production and dissemination of 10,000 copies of the 1993-94, 1994-95, and 1995-96 Diversity Calendar

* review by the DAC of important campus initiatives including the Core Curriculum and the CORe Performance Evaluation Process Improvement Team process. The DAC offered suggestions to enhance those projects with respect to diversity.

* recommendation of a university statement of policy regarding the prohibition of non-English languages in the workplace.

* sponsorship of an activity on the Mall to promote conversation about diversity in the classroom. Dialogues on Diversity brought students and faculty together to exchange information and share personal experiences that highlighted diversity in a clas sroom setting. A journalist then combined a review of the dialogue with other diversity-related information into a two-page Wildcat feature article.

Who are the members of the DAC?

Diversity Action Council members are appointed by the President to three-year terms (students, two each appointed from the undergraduate and graduate student population, serve one-year terms). DAC membership is representative of the campus as a whole, and is also representative in terms of gender, ethnicity, and other aspects of diversity.

How does one become a member of the Council?

Each Spring, the nominations committee invites nominations and applications from groups, units, and individuals campuswide. Announcements are placed in the Lo Que Pasa and The Arizona Daily Wildcat as well as through campuswide electronic and mail services.

Can I be involved without being a Council member?

Yes! Each fall, once the three teams have re-gathered and appointed a team leader, the Council invites the expertise of members of the campus community as team members for a specific task or project. These ad hoc members are also invited to attend the C ouncil meetings.

How can I get more information about the Council?

To obtain your copy of the Diversity Action Plan, recent annual Report to the President, volunteer to serve on the Council, or simply get more information, contact the Office of the Diversity Action Council, University Services Building, Rm. 220J, 888 N. Euclid, PO 210158, Tucson, AZ 85721-0158 ... or call (520) 621-8676.

Tell me more about the DAC Co-Sponsorship Program

The University of Arizona Diversity Action Council takes a leadership role in providing diversity-related programs and services at the University of Arizona. The DAC seeks to be responsive to and supportive of initiatives and programs of campus units tha t support increasing awareness and understanding of diversity related issues, increasing access to events by diverse populations, and creating positive social change within the University and the community related to diversity issues. The Council has all ocated a limited amount of funds through its 1998-1999 Co-Sponsorship Program and invites the UA community to participate.

Diversity Action Council Documents and Related University Information

•Diversity Action Plan - 1990 •President's Cabinet Vision Statement on Diversity •The Office of Decision and Planning Support A source of institutional data. DaPS includes the Office of Institutional Research (OIR) and the Student Research Office (SRO). •A Summary of Diversity Activities at The University of Arizona (1988-1997) •A Lesson in Creativity and Diversity •1998-1999 Diversity Action Council Co-Sponsorship Program

University of Arizona pretty good african studies program

A Message from the Acting Director of Africana Studies

Welcome to the Africana Studies Homepage at the University of Arizona! Africana Studies is a rapidly expanding program committed to comprehensively educating people about the breadth and depth of the African experience in the United States, Africa, and the rest of the African Diaspora. Our program is currently embarked on developing a major in Africana Studies which will complement our existing minor, as well as a Study Abroad/Exchange program with universities in Africa. We plan on offering a graduate degree in five years. We urge all students to consider Africana Studies for a minor and a major in two years. Our program is privileged to have distinguished teaching faculty in a variety of academic areas such as political sociology, history, philosophy, critical theory, literature, religion, film and art, and cultural studies. Take General Education classes with any one of our colleagues and enhance your knowledge. Come share and discuss ideas with our exciting faculty team! Remember, Knowledge is Power!

You can send me email

 

Information about LGB Studies at the U of A "

The Committee on Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual (LGB) Studies was authorized by the Provost in May, 1993 to develop curriculum and promote scholarship in this rapidly expanding interdisciplinary field of study. The Provost also contributed partial support for a one year Coordinator position. Since then the Committee has been directed by volunteer Coordinators (Janet Jakobsen '94-'96; Miranda Joseph '96-'97; Beverly Seckinger '97-'98), with the the help of a growing and increasingly active

http://w3.arizona.edu/~lgbcom/lgbmore.htm

 

Executive Committee"

In order to carry out our charge, we have undertaken four major projects:

Curriculum Development the Lesbian Looks Film and Video Series the Speaker Series

Research/Faculty Development. "

 

Interdisciplinarity has become a catch-phrase of contemporary scholarship, and yet to undertake such scholarship requires new forms of intellectual community in an academy institutionalized by disciplines. LGB Studies provides a particularly useful place for this undertaking. LGB studies scholars are trained in a variety of fields. From these various perspectives, they work on questions which connect, among others, issues of biology, history, sociology, literary and media representation, education, politics, law. The Committee's projects regularly and inevitably bring together a highly diverse group of scholars from across an amazing range of disciplines.

Collaboration

LGB Studies is a field that is highly attentive to the inextricable interconnections between sexuality and other social formations such as race, ethnicity, class, gender, and nation. Our projects and courses acknowledge and explore these connections through our selections of topics, visiting speakers, course readings, etc. And we are pursuing these connections in a more institutional sense by developing both curricular and scholarly projects in collaboration with other units on campus such as Latin American Studies, Mexican American Studies; American Indian Studies, Women's Studies and Comparative Cultural and Literary Studies.

National Role

The richness produced by this diversity and interdisciplinarity has made LGB Studies an incredibly dynamic field nationally, with courses, degree programs, conferences, journals, and publisher book lists springing up everywhere. The University of Arizona is well ahead of the curve in having assembled an important group of LGB scholars and in having established such an active set of projects and programs in this area. The U of A is truly poised to be a national leader.

Curriculum Development - History

With the support of the Deans of SBS, Humanities and Fine Arts, the Committee undertook, in 1995-96, a three semester curriculum development project. The project began in Fall '95 with regular meetings of a group of faculty drawn from Women's Studies, Law, Anthropology, English, Sociology, Media Arts, History, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, and Religious Studies, who worked together to plan the syllabus for a graduate level team-taught course (CCLS/WS 596G) that was then given in Spring '96. The course was taught by Miranda Joseph (WS), Banu Subramaniam (WS/EEB) and Barbara Cully (Eng); it drew students from the colleges of SBS, Humanities, Fine Arts, Science, Engineering, and Agriculture. The final stage of the project, built upon the first two semesters, was the development of an undergraduate general education course, Introduction to Sexuality Studies (CCLS/WS 230), taught in Fall '96 by Miranda Joseph. The Intro course was taught by Yvonne Reineke in Fall '97 and the graduate seminar in Spring '98 is being taught by Ana Ortiz (Anthropology) and Jen Croissant. Several other courses across the campus address issues of sexuality studies.

Current Projects

In order to enrich the resources for Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual Studies at the university and make those resources available to the wider community the Committee has undertaken several major projects.

Visiting Artist and Speaker Series

Brings nationally recognized scholars and artists to Tucson for public lectures, performances, seminars and workshops.

Lesbian Looks Film & Video Series

Presents important new film and video works by and about lesbians.

HYPERLINK "http://w3.arizona.edu/~lgbcom/lgbfilm.htm"

More information and schedule available

Curriculum Development Project

Coordinates new interdiscipinary graduate and undergraduate courses on sexuality studies; promotes the integration of L/G/B content into existing disciplines and programs.

 

 

 

University of Colorado Boulder

 

 

Welcome to the University of Colorado at Boulder's diversity and equity web site. This site is charged with three main purposes:

•to disseminate information about programs, policies, and issues related to diversity and multiculturalism; •to foster open communication by providing mail lists, calendars, and avenues for discussion about diversity and multiculturalism;

•and to build community among the diverse student, faculty, and staff of the University.

At the University of Colorado at Boulder, we aspire to be a place where the quality of education is enhanced and enriched by a diverse campus community — where all students benefit from multicultural experiences. In this place, we envision a campus that acknowledges and addresses the special needs of groups and individuals who historically have faced institutional barriers. We envision a place where the pervasive respect for diversity has created a supportive climate in which students are able to reach their academic potential and the entire campus benefits from participation in a multicultural community.

— CU-Boulder's Vision for a Diverse Campus Climate

"Diversity is a key to excellence in education. CU-Boulder is committed to enriching the lives of our students, faculty, and staff by providing a diverse campus where the exchange of ideas, knowledge, and perspective is an active part of learning."

--Ofelia Miramontes, Interim Associate Vice Chancellor for Diversity and Equity

Office of Diversity and Equity

Department of Equal Opportunity

 Services Provided Diversity Plan for CU-Boulder CampusDiversity and Equity: A Blueprint for Action Links to Student Programs and ServicesCounseling Services, A Multicultural CenterCultural Unity CenterDisability ServicesMinority Arts and Sciences Program (MASP)Success in Engineering through Excellence and Diversity (SEED)Office of Student Diversity (School of Journalism and Mass Communication)Precollegiate Development ProgramGay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgendered Resource CenterStudent Academic Services CenterWomen in Engineering ProgramWomen's Resource Center Links to student, faculty, and staff organizations Building Community Campaign Chancellor's Advisory Committees on Diversity

 

University of Colorado at Boulder

 

Office of Diversity and Equity

206 Regent Administration Center

Campus Box 18

Boulder, CO 80309-0018

Phone: 303-735-1332

FAX: 303-735-2425

http://www.colorado.edu/cu-diversity/

 

E-mail: cudiv@spot.colorado.edu

 

Personnel:

Ofelia Miramontes, Interim Associate Vice Chancellor

Sharon Vieyra, Administrative Assistant

MaryAnn Sergeant, Project Coordinator

 

 

 

University of Maryland College Park

 

Faculty and Staff Involvement

Office of Human Relations Programs

1130 Shriver Laboratory, East Wing

University of Maryland

College Park, MD 20742

President of the Institution:

C. D. Mote, Jr.

http://www.umd.edu

http://www.inform.umd.edu/diversity

 

Contact

Gladys Brown

Director, Office of Human Relations Programs

301-405-2838

301-314-9992 (FAX)

gb23@umail.umd.edu

Diversity of the human experience is an essential ingredient in everything we do at the University of Maryland - it enriches our education, the perspective we bring to our work, and the quality of our lives.C.D. Mote, Jr., President, University of Maryland Historical Overview

Despite its segregated past, the University of Maryland has become one of the most diverse of the nation's public research universities. For much of its history, Maryland was segregated along the lines of race and gender. The Maryland Agricultural College, the direct precursor of today's university, was founded in 1856 to educate the sons of Maryland's gentleman farmers. Women did not begin to enroll at College Park in significant numbers until the 1930s. And not until 1954, when the Supreme Court's ruling in Brown v. Board of Education prompted a new University policy, were Blacks permitted to study at the College Park campus. In 1969, the university was given a desegregation mandate by the U.S. Office of Civil Rights, a directive which remains in effect today.Change came in 1984 when then Chancellor John Slaughter challenged the campus to become a "model multiracial, multicultural, and multigenerational academic community." Former University President William E. Kirwan reaffirmed this commitment during his 1989 inaugural address, quoted above. Through its Diversity Initiative and other programs, Maryland now celebrates the cultural traditions represented on campus and encourages tolerance for differences, including those in age, class, ethnicity, race, religion, sexual orientation, political affiliation, and national origin.

 

Maryland's Commitment

The University of Maryland is committed to pursuing diversity through:

•Creating and sustaining a campus environment in which all ideas and beliefs, however unconventional and controversial, can be given free expression and advocacy

•Including representative members of groups historically denied access to educational and employment opportunities due to their race, nationality, religious affiliation, gender, age, physical or mental disability, or sexual orientation

•Enrolling a highly diverse student body and appointing faculty of different racial and cultural backgrounds.

 

Accomplishments

Minorities now comprise one-third of the freshman student body. As recently as 1975, African American students made up only 6.8 percent of the undergraduate student body, with Asian Americans comprising 1.2 percent and Hispanic Americans 0.9 percent. By the 1995-96 academic year, these groups represented 13.9, 15.1, and 4.4 percent of the undergraduate population, respectively, and women comprised 48 percent. Maryland's accomplishments in diversity are wide-ranging:

 

•Faculty and students at Maryland have done more research on diversity issues than those at any other institution in the country.

•The University awards doctoral degrees to more Blacks than any other non-historically Black Institution.

•According to the summer 1996 issue of The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, Maryland has the largest number of Black faculty--153--as well as the largest percentage--6.6 percent--of any of the nation's flagship public universities.

•A recent National Science Foundation report stated that Maryland ranks second overall in the number of African-American students graduating in the sciences. •International students and faculty come from more than 130 countries.

•Maryland has more than seventy campus organizations are aligned with the various cultural, national, religious, racial, ethnic, gender, and sexual orientations represented on campus.

•Through its Transformation of the Curriculum Project, the University has gained national recognition for integrating new scholarship relating to women and non-Western cultures into the curriculum.

 

The University of Maryland Today

Many of those interviewed during Maryland's 1991-92 reaccreditation called the university's highly diverse campus community one of the University's greatest assets.

UMCP enjoys a degree of diversity in our student body that other universities are still striving to attain. The diverse character of our student body and rich set of international resources will help us to offer a model education for the American society and workplace of the next century.University of Maryland Strategic Plan, Spring 1996

 

 

University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill

 

o Selected UNC-CH Sources

 

African-American Periodicals (UNC-CH Libraries)

African and Afro-American Studies

Asian Students Association

Communication Studies

Center For The Study Of The American South (Links to George Moses Horton Society)

Latin American People In The Triangle

Minorities In Media (School of Journalism and Mass Communication)

Native American Tribal Sites in North Carolina

The North Carolina Collection

Office of Minority Affairs

Partnership for Minority Advancement in the Biomolecular Sciences

Publications About Black Americans by UNC-CH Faculty

State Employees Association of North Carolina

Welcome to the Sonja Haynes Stone Black Cultural Center!

http://www.unc.edu/depts/bcc/

 

The Center is named after the late Dr. Sonja Haynes Stone (1938-1991), a professor at the University, who died unexpectedly before her dream of a fully functioning, freestanding BCC could be realized.

The BCC is the result of the efforts of Dr. Stone, students, faculty, staff and community people to create a center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to celebrate the richness of Black culture and the contributions of people of African descent, while fostering an atmosphere that encourages education and inclusiveness.

Since 1988, the BCC has been housed in temporary quarters in the Student Union Building, but plans are underway to build a new, 40,000 square-foot building that will contain a library, an art gallery, a media center, performance space, meeting rooms and classrooms. The center will also house the Institute of African American Research and the University's nationally acclaimed Upward Bound Program.

The $7 million projected cost of the Center is being raised from private donors. For more information on contributing to this monumental effort, please contact: Marjorie Crowell, University Development Office, Campus Box 6100, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-6100, or (919) 962-4504.

 

 

 

University of Pennsylvania

 

 

Penn State University

About the G.I.C.

Mission

 

The Albert M. Greenfield Intercultural Center is a site of activism and reflection

that promotes the co-curricular interests of students of color at Penn. By

providing a host of resources for intellectual engagement and cultural

expression, the GIC plays a vital role for all students interested in Penn's effort

to better support its increasingly diverse community.

The GIC functions as a programming as well as a recreational space for a

wide array of social, cultural, and educational programs reflecting the cultures

and heritage of US ethnic minorities. In addition to general meeting spaces

and a book and video library, the GIC also houses offices for the United

Minorities Council (UMC) and its constituent groups; Programs for Awareness

in Cultural Education (PACE); and Alliance and Understanding (A&U).

 

The Albert M. Greenfield Intercultural Center (GIC) at the University

Pennsylvania was established in 1984 to serve the needs of Penn's student of

color communities and to promote understanding and interaction between

students of all backgrounds at Penn.

In collaboration with the United Minorities Council and its organizations,

Programs for Awareness in Cultural Education, and the Black Graduate &

Professional Students Association, the GIC sponsors speakers, workshops,

as well as social and cultural programs for students, faculty, and staff at

Penn.

Additionally, the staff at the GIC welcomes the opportunity to serve as a

resource on a host of issues related to diversity. Our video and book library

can be used as resources to facilitate dialogue about the contributions of

communities of color in America as well as the issues that impact these

communities. Also available at the GIC is a directory of Asian American

community service organizations in the Greater Philadelphia area.

Facilities

Room Reservations

To support various educational, cultural, and social programs, the GIC can

accommodate meetings and programs. Room reservations must be submitted

either in person at the GIC or through an online request form.

Reservations can be made following rooms:

Lobby

A large track lighted, hardwood floored meeting room with an adjoining full

kitchen. Additionally, this room is equipped with a large screen television and

a complete stereo system. For 25 people

Library

A small conference room with hardwood floors. Equipped with a computer.

Our video collection is located in the Library. Our collection includes

documentaries, feature length and independent films. The Video Catalogue will

soon be available online.

Patio Room

A finished basement that can be used for classes, rehearsals, and receptions.

Equipped with a 27 inch television and complete stereo system. For 50 people

Outdoor Patio

Adjoins the Patio Room and includes a side lawn. This area is partially

defined by a grape arbor and rhododendron which provide privacy and shade.

 

Excerpt from schedule of events

APRIL

Thursday, 1st

Fontaine Society Spring Conference

"Affirmative Actions: Education, Race and Law"

This conference aims to respond to the growing concern about the intellectual

and political implications of recently enacted anti-civil rights legislation,

including propositions 187 ans 209 passed in California within the last few

years.

For more information contact, Edith G. Arrington, ega@dolphin.upenn.edu,

Chair 1999 Fontaine Society

Tuesday, 6th

GIC PUBLIC LECTURE in collaboration with the Kelly Writers House

Victor Hernandez Cruz, Puerto Rican poet

6 p.m.

Writers House, 3805 Locust Walk

Thursday, 8th -

Sunday, 11th

Scholars Weekend

Contact: Rodney Morrison, rodney@pobox.upenn.edu

Friday, 9th

United Minorities Council dinner

In collaboration with Scholars Weekend

Time: 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Location: TBA

Contact: Chaz Howard, choward@sas.upenn.edu

Saturday, 10th

Barrio Fiesta- Filipino Cultural Festival

Contact: Fred Li, fjli@sas

South Asian Society presents

HOLI show

Contact: Sonal Mehta, sonalmeh@sas.upenn.edu

Monday, 12th

Program for Awareness in Cultural Education presents

White American Racism (Part 3 of 3)

What is Whiteness? What is White privilege? What is White responsibility?

Come and find the answers to these thought provoking questions.

Time: 7:00pm - 8:30pm

Location: Greenfield Intercultural Center, 3708 Chestnut Street

Contact: Michelle Szpara, paceprog@dolphin

Wednesday, 17th

Chinese Student Association presents

CSA Spring Fling Party

For more information, contact Michael Chan, mike24@sas.upenn.edu

Thursday, 22nd

Korean Student Association presents

Korean Cultural Show

Location: Zellerbach Theatre, 36th & Walnut Streets

Contact: hshin@sas or tashin@wharton

Friday, 23rd

Penn Taiwanese Society presents

"Making Tracks - Immigrants Traverse Mile and Generations in Song"

Time: 7:30pm

Location: Zellerbach Theatre, 36th & Walnut Streets

Contact: Henny Jau, jenny@wharton.upenn.edu

Chinese Student Association presents

CSA Spring Banquet

For more information, contact Michael Chan, mike24@sas.upenn.edu

 

Core Staff

Valerie De Cruz, Director

Karlene Burrell-McRae, Associate Director

Tiffany Anderson-Purvy, Office Coordinator

Ruby Paceco, Program Coordinator

 

Center for CULTURAL STUDIES

Professor Gerald Prince, Co-Director

521 Williams Hall/6305

215-898-8458

Professor Joan DeJean, Co-Director

521 Williams Hall/6305

215-898-7432

 

University of Pennsylvania

100 College Hall

Philadelphia, PA 19104

President of the Institution:

Dr. Judith S. Rodin

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http://dolphin.upenn.edu/~gic/

 

Contact

Valerie Hayes

Executive Director

(215) 898-6993

(FAX)

vhayes@pobox.upenn.edu

 

 

 

University of Washington

 

 

U of Washington

President of the Institution:

Dr. Richard L. McCormick

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http://www.washington.edu

 

http://www.oma.washington.edu

 

Contact

Myron Apilado

Vice President for Minority Affairs

(206) 685-0774

(206) 543-2746 (FAX)

myron@u.washington.edu

The title "Office of Minority Affairs" (OMA) is somewhat deceptive, in as much as it leads to the belief that the OMA is responsible for all minority affairs for the University of Washington. While the Office of Minority Affairs is an important part of the diversity effort of the University, it is not the only department offering programs to underrepresented minorities and economically/educationally disadvantaged students.

The Office of Minority Affairs' primary programmatic responsibility is the Educational Opportunity Program (EOP). EOP was the first (established nearly 30 years ago) and continues to be one program that provides educational opportunities at the University of Washington to the underrepresented populations of the State, specifically underrepresented minorities and economically/educationally disadvantaged students. Over the past 30 years, however, the Office of Minority Affairs has grown to be more comprehensive and now serves a much broader constituency. The OMA now also offers partnerships and outreach programs to underserved middle and high school students and to communities at large across the state, and offers a program which encourages students to apply to graduate and professional schools.

 

While the OMA is undoubtedly a lead department for encouraging and advocating for increased minority participation and diversity throughout the University, it is only one of many departments where the promotion of diversity is important. The Office of Minority Affairs' overall mission is to increase the recruitment, retention, and graduation rates of underrepresented minorities and economically/educationally disadvantaged students. At the university level, the OMA's major responsibilities are to assure that the students served are properly equipped to compete academically and that they have sufficient funds to pay for their education. It is in these two areas that the OMA reviews and revises current strategies and promotes new strategies in order to increase student viability and to raise funds for scholarships. The OMA also promotes cultural activities including a speaker's bureau, activities commemorating special holidays, student-sponsored dramatic and musical productions held at the Ethnic Cultural Theatre, and on-campus cultural events.

 

Institute for Ethnic Studies in the United States (IESUS)

The Institute for Ethnic Studies in the United States was established in the University of Washington Graduate School in 1981 to encourage multi-ethnic, and ethnic-specific multi-disciplinary research on problems or issues pertaining to members of ethnic minority groups, particularly those living in the Pacific Northwest. Its thrust is toward generating significant scholarly publications and other scholarly activity.

IESUS aspires to generate scholarly input about ethnic studies by creating new knowledge and by stimulating and supporting the scholarly activities of relevant faculty (i.e., particularly minority and junior faculty). Our support for current research and scholarship could, of course, take the form of paying for the support services for the completion of manuscripts, or assisting in the completion of an on-going research project. The primary goals of the IESUS are as follows:

To support research and scholarly activities of faculty members, especially less senior ones and minority faculty.

To support the preparation of grant proposals for external funding by relevant faculty relative to the goals of the Institute.

The assumption in setting forth the above goals is that the Institute should build for the future by supporting present research productivity to develop our national visibility to the point where we can more readily gain research grants.

Application and Deadlines

Proposals are accepted twice a year: April 1 and November 15. Decisions will be made within six weeks of submission.

You can contact the Institute at:

"mailto:Iesus@u.washington.edu"

iesus@u.washington.edu

, (206) 685-9333, or University of Washington campus BOX 351525.

William H. George, Director

Joel Martell, Research Assistant

Intercultural communication study

History of NWCROW

The Northwest Center for Research on Women (NWCROW) was established in 1980 by scholars at the University of Washington to promote, disseminate, and support feminist research by and about women. At present, NWCROW continues to focus on bringing women into academic areas from which they traditionally have been excluded. Through these efforts, we take steps towards making academia more inclusive, expanding knowledge about women in society, creating an environment that encourages and supports faculty and students' work on gender-related issues, and finally, building and sustaining a feminist community of scholars. Our activities involve original research and the organization of lecture series and panel discussions on feminist research and on the climate for women in academia.

The Northwest Center for Research on Women

Imogen Cunningham Hall

Box 351380

University of Washington

Seattle, WA 98195-1380

tel. (206) 543-9531, fax (206) 685-4490

http://depts.washington.edu/~nwcrow/